nightmare

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nightmare

 [nīt´mār]
a terrifying dream; an anxiety attack during dreaming, accompanied by mild autonomic reactions and usually awakening the dreamer, who recalls the dream but is oriented.
nightmare disorder a sleep disorder of the parasomnia group, consisting of repeated episodes of nightmares.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

night·mare

(nīt'mār),
A terrifying dream, as in which one is unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
See also: incubus, succubus.
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nightmare

(nīt′mâr′)
n.
1. A dream arousing feelings of intense fear, horror, and distress.
2. An event or experience that is intensely distressing.

night′mar′ish adj.
night′mar′ish·ly adv.
night′mar′ish·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nightmare

Anxiety dream, dream anxiety attack Psychiatry An anxiety-provoking dream occurring during REM sleep, accompanied by autonomic nervous system hyperactivity Onset Begins in childhood usually before age 10, more common in girls, often seen in normal childhood unless they interfere with sleep, development or psychosocial development; nightmares in adulthood are often associated with outside stressors or coincide with another mental disorder; nightmares usually occur during REM sleep and include unpleasant or frightening dreams; they are most common in the early morning, and may follow frightening movies/TV shows or emotional situations, but may be associated with psychological disturbances or severe stress, especially in adults Treatment None. Cf Sleep terror disorder.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

night·mare

(nīt'mār)
A terrifying dream, as if one were unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
Synonym(s): incubus (2) .
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

nightmare

A frightening dream occurring during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep often connected with a traumatic prior event such as an assault or a car accident. Nightmares may be caused by withdrawal of sleeping tablets. The Anglo-Saxon word maere means an evil male spirit or incubus intent on sexual intercourse with a sleeping woman, but nightmares seldom have a sexual content.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the many other disconcerting symptoms of PTSD, it is estimated that almost 5 million Americans suffer from Nightmare Disorder related to PTSD.
Nightmares and Nightmare Disorder have reportedly been linked to increased suicidality, heightened risk of heart disease, diabetes and contributes to cognitive difficulties including memory loss, anxiety, depression and other physical and mental conditions.
However, frequent or recurring nightmares can interfere with sleep, contribute to anxiety and stress and have a detrimental effect on wellbeing.
[USA], Dec 22 ( ANI ): Turns out, nightmares are an indicator of mental health problems, such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.
"Extremely concerned a 3D impressionist selfie of a man with a moustache that's actually a f**king Brandy snap will come to me in my nightmares tonight," one tweeted.
And while daydreams sometimes do not turn into nightmares, they can keep us comfortable but not growing--and soon our lives feel stale and purposeless.
military personnel with sleep disturbances, nightmares are highly prevalent, and nightmares are frequently comorbid with other sleep and mental health disorders, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.
Ever since a tragedy caused her family to move away from home, Natalie has had intense recurring nightmares in which she is drawn toward a door in an old house back in her hometown.
The nightmares, fears, and all manner of what-ifs that inhabit this shadow world are unfamiliar to him--all except one: the Lairdbalor, Jamie's personal nightmare, once relegated to his dreams.
A recent (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28712041) study published in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology suggests sleeping more than nine hours a night can increase the occurrence of nightmares.
Little Nightmares is a puzzle-platformer game that has you playing as Six, a barefoot young girl in a yellow coat, trapped in a disturbing underwater resort known as The Maw.
Nightmares are a common feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that could lead to fatigue, impaired concentration, and poor work performance.