nightmare

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nightmare

 [nīt´mār]
a terrifying dream; an anxiety attack during dreaming, accompanied by mild autonomic reactions and usually awakening the dreamer, who recalls the dream but is oriented.
nightmare disorder a sleep disorder of the parasomnia group, consisting of repeated episodes of nightmares.

night·mare

(nīt'mār),
A terrifying dream, as in which one is unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
See also: incubus, succubus.
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]

nightmare

/night·mare/ (nīt´mār″) a terrifying dream, usually awakening the dreamer.

nightmare

(nīt′mâr′)
n.
1. A dream arousing feelings of intense fear, horror, and distress.
2. An event or experience that is intensely distressing.

night′mar′ish adj.
night′mar′ish·ly adv.
night′mar′ish·ness n.

nightmare

[nīt′mer]
Etymology: AS, niht, night, mara, incubus
a dream occurring during rapid eye movement sleep that arouses feelings of intense inescapable fear, terror, distress, or extreme anxiety and that usually awakens the sleeper. Compare pavor nocturnus, sleep terror disorder.

nightmare

Anxiety dream, dream anxiety attack Psychiatry An anxiety-provoking dream occurring during REM sleep, accompanied by autonomic nervous system hyperactivity Onset Begins in childhood usually before age 10, more common in girls, often seen in normal childhood unless they interfere with sleep, development or psychosocial development; nightmares in adulthood are often associated with outside stressors or coincide with another mental disorder; nightmares usually occur during REM sleep and include unpleasant or frightening dreams; they are most common in the early morning, and may follow frightening movies/TV shows or emotional situations, but may be associated with psychological disturbances or severe stress, especially in adults Treatment None. Cf Sleep terror disorder.

night·mare

(nīt'mār)
A terrifying dream, as if one were unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
Synonym(s): incubus (2) .
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]

nightmare

A frightening dream occurring during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep often connected with a traumatic prior event such as an assault or a car accident. Nightmares may be caused by withdrawal of sleeping tablets. The Anglo-Saxon word maere means an evil male spirit or incubus intent on sexual intercourse with a sleeping woman, but nightmares seldom have a sexual content.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several other questionnaires were also administered to address the relationship between nightmares and stress.
Take some of your experiences and perhaps some of your nightmares and turn them into narratives in which your trip leaders can decide what to do in those tough spots.
Operating out of an old, neglected Soviet air base, the Nightmares encountered numerous challenges but have overcome them.
He and his associates randomized 88 women to image rehearsal therapy, in which patients create alternative scenarios for chronic nightmares, or to a waiting list.
But they also agreed that to avoid the nightmares brought on by this lack of comfort, CEOs need to stop thinking that technology is merely a faster way of doing things.
During the time-consuming process of writing The Last Time I Wore a Dress, her memoir (written with Jane Meredith Adams) about the years she was institutionalized, Scholinski's nightmares grew worse.
The nightmares would usually start if I had a cat-nap between filming.
Real Estate Nightmares," the popular Queens-based cable television talk show, was awarded Best Talk Show and Best Studio Series at the CAPA Festival sponsored by Queens Public Access Television.
Childrens' nightmares are haunted by demons, some imagined, others real.
Here there are no nightmares, only the presence, perhaps, of a slow-growing virus that eradicates the capacity for human contact.
There on the tube was the universe from which he'd been banished: nubile chainsaw massacres and nightmares on Elm Street, tabloid news shows serving up slo-mo reenactments of the sex crimes of the day, misogynist rappers and hate comics reciting brutal nursery rhymes, the basic death instincts on parade like so many Robocops of the id.
But students described most nightmares -- even those incorporating a quake theme--as only slightly to moderately intense, in contrast to some clinical assumptions that exposure to a traumatic event sparks particularly vivid nightmares, report psychologist James M.