nightmare

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nightmare

 [nīt´mār]
a terrifying dream; an anxiety attack during dreaming, accompanied by mild autonomic reactions and usually awakening the dreamer, who recalls the dream but is oriented.
nightmare disorder a sleep disorder of the parasomnia group, consisting of repeated episodes of nightmares.

night·mare

(nīt'mār),
A terrifying dream, as in which one is unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
See also: incubus, succubus.
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]

nightmare

/night·mare/ (nīt´mār″) a terrifying dream, usually awakening the dreamer.

nightmare

(nīt′mâr′)
n.
1. A dream arousing feelings of intense fear, horror, and distress.
2. An event or experience that is intensely distressing.

night′mar′ish adj.
night′mar′ish·ly adv.
night′mar′ish·ness n.

nightmare

[nīt′mer]
Etymology: AS, niht, night, mara, incubus
a dream occurring during rapid eye movement sleep that arouses feelings of intense inescapable fear, terror, distress, or extreme anxiety and that usually awakens the sleeper. Compare pavor nocturnus, sleep terror disorder.

nightmare

Anxiety dream, dream anxiety attack Psychiatry An anxiety-provoking dream occurring during REM sleep, accompanied by autonomic nervous system hyperactivity Onset Begins in childhood usually before age 10, more common in girls, often seen in normal childhood unless they interfere with sleep, development or psychosocial development; nightmares in adulthood are often associated with outside stressors or coincide with another mental disorder; nightmares usually occur during REM sleep and include unpleasant or frightening dreams; they are most common in the early morning, and may follow frightening movies/TV shows or emotional situations, but may be associated with psychological disturbances or severe stress, especially in adults Treatment None. Cf Sleep terror disorder.

night·mare

(nīt'mār)
A terrifying dream, as if one were unable to cry for help or to escape from a seemingly impending evil.
Synonym(s): incubus (2) .
[A.S. nyht, night, + mara, a demon]

nightmare

A frightening dream occurring during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep often connected with a traumatic prior event such as an assault or a car accident. Nightmares may be caused by withdrawal of sleeping tablets. The Anglo-Saxon word maere means an evil male spirit or incubus intent on sexual intercourse with a sleeping woman, but nightmares seldom have a sexual content.
References in classic literature ?
There was such anguish in the gush of grief that accompanied this raving, that my compassion made me overlook its folly, and I drew off, half angry to have listened at all, and vexed at having related my ridiculous nightmare, since it produced that agony; though WHY was beyond my comprehension.
After he had gone the women sat about and moaned and wailed until Jane thought that she should go mad; but, knowing that they were doing it all out of the kindness of their hearts, she endured the frightful waking nightmare of those awful hours in dumb and patient suffering.
Was it one of those nightmare things in which you find yourself engaged or married to some one you hate or don't know, without the slightest idea how it ever came about?
He remembered his walk westward yesterday with a shudder, as though indeed it had been a sort of nightmare, and wondered whether she too had regarded him with the eyes of those loungers on the pavement - whether she too was one of those who looked for a man to conform to the one arbitrary and universal type.
He decided then that this was some sort of gruesome nightmare with which he was afflicted.
But White Fang was to have no more than a nightmare vision of the city--an experience that was like a bad dream, unreal and terrible, that haunted him for long after in his dreams.
I thought this a bad dream and tried to cry out, as one does in a nightmare, but could make no sound.
My next nightmare vision was a quiet street of the dead.
Why do you allow these two barbarous men to keep you here while the great Bootmann is playing the Nightmare Sonata in the next room?
As to the cries, I was in no difficulty; since she was alone in her room these could result from nightmare only.
Not for nothing had I been called "Sissy" Van Weyden, I thought, as I tossed restlessly on my bunk between one nightmare and another.
But this dream weighed on her like a nightmare, and she awoke from it in terror.