Nightingale

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Nightingale

 [nīt´in-gāl″]
Florence (1820– 1910). Founder of modern nursing. She was born in Florence, Italy, of English parents. In 1854 she led a group of nurses to the Crimea to care for English troops, and later she reorganized military nursing and sanitation in England and then India. She also contributed to the field of dietetics, and her skill as a statistician in gathering data won her election to the Royal Statistical Society and honorary membership in the American Statistical Association.
Florence Nightingale. Courtesy of Florence Nightingale Museum, London, U.K.

Night·in·gale

(nīt'in-gāl),
Florence, 1820-1910. English nurse; founder of modern nursing.
References in classic literature ?
"Tell it to me," said the Nightingale, "I am not afraid."
"Death is a great price to pay for a red rose," cried the Nightingale, "and Life is very dear to all.
"Be happy," cried the Nightingale, "be happy; you shall have your red rose.
The Student looked up from the grass, and listened, but he could not understand what the Nightingale was saying to him, for he only knew the things that are written down in books.
But the Oak-tree understood, and felt sad, for he was very fond of the little Nightingale who had built her nest in his branches.
So the Nightingale sang to the Oak-tree, and her voice was like water bubbling from a silver jar.
And when the Moon shone in the heavens the Nightingale flew to the Rose-tree, and set her breast against the thorn.
But the Tree cried to the Nightingale to press closer against the thorn.
So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and louder and louder grew her song, for she sang of the birth of passion in the soul of a man and a maid.
But the thorn had not yet reached her heart, so the rose's heart remained white, for only a Nightingale's heart's-blood can crimson the heart of a rose.
So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her.
But the Nightingale's voice grew fainter, and her little wings began to beat, and a film came over her eyes.