Nightingale


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Nightingale

 [nīt´in-gāl″]
Florence (1820– 1910). Founder of modern nursing. She was born in Florence, Italy, of English parents. In 1854 she led a group of nurses to the Crimea to care for English troops, and later she reorganized military nursing and sanitation in England and then India. She also contributed to the field of dietetics, and her skill as a statistician in gathering data won her election to the Royal Statistical Society and honorary membership in the American Statistical Association.
Florence Nightingale. Courtesy of Florence Nightingale Museum, London, U.K.

Night·in·gale

(nīt'in-gāl),
Florence, 1820-1910. English nurse; founder of modern nursing.

Nightingale, Florence

(1820-1910), considered the founder of modern nursing. After limited formal training in nursing in Germany and Paris, she became superintendent in 1853 of a small hospital in London. Her outstanding success in reorganizing the hospital led the British government to request that she head a mission to the Crimea, where Britain was fighting a war with Russia. After her return to England in 1856, she wrote Notes on Hospitals and Notes on Nursing and founded a training school for nurses at St. Thomas' Hospital, where she attracted well-educated, dedicated women. The graduates became matrons of the most important hospitals in Great Britain, thus raising the standards of nursing across the nation and eventually around the world. Although she was, by then, bedridden much of the time, she carried on her work on the sanitary reform of India, conducted a study of midwifery, helped establish visiting nurse services, and worked for the reform of the poor laws in which she proposed separate institutions for the sick, the insane, the incurable, and children. One of Florence Nightingale's outstanding contributions was significantly decreasing the infection-related death rate through cleanliness. After Longfellow wrote Santa Filomena, she became known as "The Lady with the Lamp"; the Nightingale Pledge, named after her, embodies her ideals and has inspired thousands of young graduating nurses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nightingale - who claims on his Facebook page that he was a Western District boxing champion in 2010 and won bronze at the British Championships in 2010 and 2011 - admitted raising his hands to Calum and Emma.
As Nightingale reveals to his wealthy brother-in-law, Loyal, he "made $12,400 last year, before taxes.
Nightingale Awards for Leadership in Clinical Practice: outstanding nurses who motivated others to work toward a common goal: Karen Sublett, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Oncology Services, Penrose St.
It's lovely to see a company like M&S supporting the hospice and we are really grateful for everything they | Above, putting up paper lining at Nightingale House Hospice are M&S workers Sarah Davies and Amanda Hutchinson.
The acquisition of Nightingales Canadian operations is subject to customary closing conditions, including Nightingale shareholder approval and regulatory approval.
Nightingale pinned Dalton down for long spells and forced a number of corners, however Dalton held firm, with Bradley Riley clearing a goalbound shot off the line and the follow up from Harvey Preston sailing high over the bar.
Nightingale came under the scrutiny of the RSPCA after they became aware of a video from his Facebook account showing dogs killing a wild rabbit.
Pulse, under a license agreement, will also enhance and further develop, sublicense and sell Nightingale V10 in the US.
The story unfolds as a personal narrative, as Nightingale marvels at the outpouring of local hospitality, negotiates the tribulations of house repairs and contemplates his daughter's assimilation into Andalusian life.
Catholic Charities' Nightingale program provides 13 respite beds for homeless adults who are referred when discharged from the hospital or emergency room.
Sydney Hospital proudly contains the Lucy Osburn-Nightingale Museum on the first floor of the historic Nightingale Wing.
Representing the transfer of knowledge from one nurse to another, the lamp will be taken from the Florence Nightingale Chapel during the service and escorted by a procession of nurses to the Dean, who will place it on the high altar.