nexus

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nexus

 [nek´sus]
1. a bond, as between members of a series or group.

gap junc·tion

1. an intercellular junction formerly considered to be a tight, membrane-to-membrane junction (macula occludens) but now shown to have a 2-nm gap between apposed cell membranes; the gap is not void but contains subunits in the form of polygonal lattices, which are the intercellular aspects of the two connexons that fit together, forming a channel between the cytoplasms of the two cells; it occurs in epithelia, between certain nerve cells, and in smooth and cardiac muscle; it is believed to mediate electrotonic coupling, which allows ionic currents to pass from one cell to another.
See also: synapse.
See also: connexons.
2. areas of increased electrochemical communication between myometrial cells that aid in the propagation of the contractions of labor.
See also: connexons.

gap junc·tion

(gap jŭngk'shŭn)
1. An intercellular junction having a 2-nm gap between apposed cell membranes; the gap contains subunits in the form of polygonal lattices; it occurs in epithelia, between certain nerve cells, and in smooth and cardiac muscle.
See also: synapse
2. Areas of increased electrochemical communication between myometrial cells that aid in the propagation of the contractions of labor.
Synonym(s): nexus.
References in periodicals archive ?
1416, 1426 (1989) (describing the nexus of contracts theory as "a shorthand for the complex arrangements of many sorts that those who associate voluntarily in the corporation will work out among themselves").
Bainbridge, The Board of Directors as Nexus of Contracts, 88 IOWA L.
Eisenberg, The Conception That the Corporation is a Nexus of Contracts, and the Dual Nature of the Firm, 24 J.
See Bainbridge, supra note 13, at 11 ("I have come around to the view that the corporation is a nexus of contracts in a literal sense, albeit a very limited one."); Julian Velasco, Shareholder Ownership and Primacy, 2010 U.
See, e.g., MACEY, supra note 2, at 22 ("It has long been recognized.., that the corporation.., should be viewed as a 'nexus of contracts' or set of implicit and explicit contracts?'); Stephen M.
180, 184 (1992) ("Easterbrook and Fischel are so astute that they keep a safe distance from the assertion that the corporation is a nexus of contracts. The book delimits and subordinates this once foundational proposition.").