gravitation

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grav·i·ta·tion

(grav'i-tā'shŭn),
The force of attraction between any two bodies in the universe, varying directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between their centers; expressed as F = Gm1m2l -2, where G (newtonian constant of gravitation) = 6.67259 × 10-11 m3 kg-1 s-2, m1 and m2 are the masses (in kg) of the two bodies, and l is the distance separating them in meters.
[L. gravitas, weight]

gravitation

(grăv″ĭ-tā′shŭn) [L. gravitas, weight]
The force and movement tending to draw every particle of matter together, esp. the attraction of the earth for bodies at a distance from its center.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main purpose of this paper is to derive the Newton's law of gravitation by means of fluid mechanics based on sink flow model of particles.
Since the Newton's law of gravitation was published in 1687 [33], this action-at-a-distance theory was criticized by the French Cartesian [9].
Inspired by the aforementioned thoughts and others [52-56], we show that the Newton's law of gravitation is derived based on the assumption that all the particles are made of singularities of a kind of ideal fluid.