Newfoundland

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Newfoundland

a very large (100-150 lb), black or bronze, longhaired dog with massive head, small pendulous ears and bushy tail. A black and white version is known as Landseer. The breed is predisposed to subaortic stenosis, cardiomyopathy and hypothyroidism.
References in periodicals archive ?
As transplanted Toronto police officer Gary Mackenzie observes, Newfoundlanders are "inordinately pleased with themselves.
She notes the obvious truth that if it is an ethnicity it is sort of once removed, as the vast majority of Newfoundlanders are of Irish or West Country English heritage.
With a broad theoretical underpinning informed by Marxist geography and critical labour history, and geared toward an anthropology of labour, she spent approximately twelve months in the oil sands region as an active participant in the daily lives of a small group of Newfoundlanders, most of whom had come to Fort McMurray between 1977 and 1985.
MH: Has this impression of helplessness in the face of wilderness been effectively counteracted by the way Newfoundlanders have lived?
It is difficult to gather accurate statistics on the number of Newfoundlanders living in Alberta (not to mention the problem of defining Newfoundlander).
Newfoundlander, 1 Match 1881; 30 June 1882; Carbonear Herald and Outport Telephone, 16 September 1880; 13 May 1881.
There's a tale told of a talented CBC television producer, a Newfoundlander, who turned to his colleagues one day and said: "Come on, boys, let's go down to Quidi Vidi [the closest cove to St John's harbour] and go out in a boat so we can sail in through the Narrows"--an allusion to the belief that Newfoundlanders were often passed over for jobs and promotions in the cultural arena, in favour of those from away.
Roche introduced himself as a born and bred Newfoundlander who like his aunt--the well-known Catholic writer Anne Roche Muggeridge--still remembers the wonderful Catholic devotional practices of pre-Vatican days.
The native Newfoundlander and chemistry professor at Saint Mary's University craves most shellfish food, like mussels, all harvested from the Atlantic.
In an essay that explored the notion of a `Newfoundland culture', Overton looked at many accounts describing the essential elements of being a Newfoundlander.
As the author explains, it is not about the history of a single regiment, but the story of a number of regiments with a distinct Newfoundlander component.
When she, in turn, is quoted by a Newfoundlander, the havoc will sound as though it had been wrecked.

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