neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
"The volunteers rated the emotional impact of the f-word, as one and half times more emotional than the new words."
The researchers found the toddlers learned new words more effectively from other children.
Why do bad neologisms (new words) get our attention?
The new Word Add-In strengthens Pro-Sapien's market position as the leading EHS solution for Microsoft integration and will be available from October 2018.
Other new words in the list reflect modern society, trends and events, such as twerking, devo (short for devolution, as in Devo Max), vape (to inhale from an electric cigarette), onesie, shootie (fashionable shoe that covers the ankle), cakeages (restaurant charges levied for serving cake brought in from outside), and podiumed (often used at sporting events, particularly the Olympics).
But the new chief editor of the Oxford English Dictionary will never grow tired of finding new words for the world's most famous English language reference book.
Figure 2 Presenting a New Word Introduce the new word [right arrow] Provide synonyms [right arrow] Describe or explain the word [right arrow] Use the word in a sentence [FIGURE 3 OMITTED]
The new dictionary will consist of new words that have been used in at least three different publications since 1989.
A pamphlet describes the Cuban teaching process as moving from "the idea to the word, from the word to the phoneme, from the phoneme to the new word, from the new words to new ideas and those new ideas transform student's thoughts, words and actions."
When emperor Hadrian devised a new dish, a 4-flavour kedgeree, he had to come up with a new word for it, "Tetrapharmacum".
He is forced to coin words himself, and, taking his pain in one hand, and a lump of pure sound in the other (as perhaps the people of Babel did in the beginning), so to crush them together that a brand new word in the end drops out.