New Hampshire rule

New Hamp·shire rule

pioneering U.S. test of criminal responsibility (1871): "if the [criminal] act was the offspring of insanity, a criminal intent did not produce it."
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

New Hamp·shire rule

(nū-hamp'shĭr rūl)
Pioneering U.S. test of criminal responsibility (1871): "if the [criminal] act was the offspring of insanity, a criminal intent did not produce it."
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In an opinion piece in Foster's Daily Democrat of Dover, New Hampshire, Robert McNamara, president of the New Hampshire Bar Association, wrote that "pro se litigants may save themselves money, but they often put the state and their opponents to great expense, while unnecessarily delaying the resolution of their own case." McNamara praised the New Hampshire rule change, saying unbundling "will likely improve outcomes for litigants and reduce the burden on our courts."
It will align the New Hampshire rule more closely with current NASD requirements, contends Glennon.
The New Hampshire rule has been in effect since March 2003.
Hoofnagle, who filed an amicus brief in Boyer on EPIC's behalf, thinks "other states dealing with privacy issues are likely to adopt the New Hampshire rule. When you have an uneven landscape of state [privacy] protections, [information services] generally will comply with the highest standard."
The New Hampshire rule also complicates bookkeeping, because the same asset will need to be depreciated differently over its life for federal and state taxes, respectively.
"A New Hampshire licensed land surveyor, bound by New Hampshire rules and standards is the professional that can certify such work."
The respondent's representation of the defendant, when there was a significant risk that the representation would be materially limited by the respondent's responsibilities of confidentiality to the victim, who was his former patient, was a concurrent conflict of interest that violated Rule 1.7(a)(2) of the New Hampshire Rules of Professional Conduct.
New Hampshire rules vary greatly from federal laws, and include the business profits tax, business enterprise tax, and rooms and meals tax.

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