Neurotransmitters


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Neurotransmitters: serotonin, dopamine

neurotransmitters

A range of small-molecule chemical substances released by EXOCYTOSIS from a nerve ending on the arrival of a nerve impulse. Neurotransmitters are specific to particular neurons. They interacts with receptors on adjacent structures to trigger off a response, either excitatory or inhibitory. The adjacent structure may be another nerve, a muscle fibre or a gland. The main neurotransmitters are acetylcholine, glycine, glutamate, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, histamine and GABA (gamma-amino-butyric acid). With the exception of the adrenalines all the neurotransmitters are AMINO ACIDS or derivatives of amino acids.

Neurotransmitters

Chemicals within the nervous system that transmit information from or between nerve cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Amino acids are the building blocks of neurotransmitters and some can cross the blood-brain barrier.
The artificial cell is made from an electricity-conducting plastic and can deliver different kinds of neurotransmitter.
Hyperexcitability: Excessive activity of a nerve cell or neural system resulting from excessive responsiveness to excitatory neurotransmitters or reduced responsiveness to inhibitory neurotransmitters.
Several years ago there were no "pediatric neurotransmitter diseases." That's not to say that these devastating disorders recently arrived from some alien life form.
Neurotransmitters regulate many different aspects of mood, cognition, and behavior, such as emotional state, reactions to stress, pain, and the physical drives of sleep, appetite, and sexuality.
Neurons respond to the floods of neurotransmitters by altering their chemical message system.
If you want to know the condition of your body in the future, look at your mind now." Thousands of years before neurotransmitters were discovered, Ayurveda understood the relationship between mind and body.
Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme that reduces neurotransmitters to their metabolites for excretion, thus providing an essential component of the normal cycle of transmitter production and excretion.
It's a sense that early relapse with subsequent need for escalating doses is more common today with SSRIs than when patients were treated with tricyclic antidepressants and other agents affecting multiple neurotransmitters.
The pharmacology of all SSRIs is in some ways similar to that of other antidepressants, such as the tricyclic antidepressant compounds (TCAs), which block the reuptake of various neurotransmitters. However, as the name implies, SSRI drugs are highly selective reuptake inhibitors and have little effect on other neurotransmitters, such as norepinephrine or dopamine.
There are 30 or 40 neurotransmitters that are used by the ten million cells of the brain.

Full browser ?