neuroprosthetics

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neuroprosthetics

(noor?o-pros-thet'iks, nur?) [ neuro- + prosthetics]
Any biomedically engineered device designed to be linked to the peripheral or central nervous system and enhance the cognitive, motor, or sensory abilities of an organism.
Synonym: neural prosthetics
References in periodicals archive ?
"We believe that intraneural stimulation can be a valuable solution for several neuroprosthetic devices for sensory and motor function restoration.
"We're applying this finding to brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetic devices, like cochlear implants."
He is working to develop neuroprosthetic devices capable of bypassing these damaged areas and restoring volitional control of movement to paralyzed limbs.
Neuroprosthetic electrodes are designed to facilitate functional restoration of a neural path related to disorders and traumas of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Parkinson's disease, retinitis pigmentosa, epilepsy, depression, and chronic pain [1-4].
In theory at least, a single individual, equipped with a cortical implant, could wirelessly control neuroprosthetic devices in one or many robots situated in distant locales.
Ghovanloo, "Optimization of data coils in a multiband wireless link for neuroprosthetic implantable devices," IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems, vol.
For many years, functional electrical stimulation has been applied as a neuroprosthetic, in which the application of patterned peripheral neuromuscular stimulation evokes functional movements in the absence of voluntary muscle activation [2-4].
Where the communication circuitry of the eye is no longer functional, as for trauma or glaucoma, neuroprosthetic stimulation would have to be in the visual parts of the brain.
Tillery, "Selection and parameterization of cortical neurons for neuroprosthetic control," Journal of Neural Engineering, vol.
The scientists, who treated the monkeys with a neuroprosthetic interface that acted as a wireless bridge between the brain and spine, say they have started small feasibility studies in humans to trial some components.
These research findings have further demonstrated that LFPs during onset of movement contain supportive information that may advance our knowledge towards reliable movement decoding strategies for neuroprosthetic device developments, diagnostic assessments, and possible treatment of some chronic neurological disorders.