neuroprosthetics

(redirected from Neuroprostheses)

neuroprosthetics

(noor?o-pros-thet'iks, nur?) [ neuro- + prosthetics]
Any biomedically engineered device designed to be linked to the peripheral or central nervous system and enhance the cognitive, motor, or sensory abilities of an organism.
Synonym: neural prosthetics
References in periodicals archive ?
"Stem cells and neuroprostheses could change the landscape of regenerative medicine in the future," noted Dr.
The Pisa-Lund group generated artificial touch experiences with a bionic fingertip currently used for robotic upper limb neuroprostheses. These artificial touch experiences were provided to the touch sensor nerves of the skin in the rat, as a kind of neuroscientific playback of information to the brain.
In motor system neuroprostheses, FNS consists of multiple channels of electrical stimulation on peripheral nerves to produce controlled muscle contractions and generate useful movements of paralyzed limbs.
Caggiano et al., "Proprioceptive feedback and brain computer interface (BCI) based neuroprostheses," PLoS One, vol.
To control brain-actuated devices, such as robotics and neuroprostheses, both fast decision-making and a stable control signal with a minimal error rate are important [10, 11].
In addition, wireless implant technology today is also used to control pumps for a gradual drug dosage, as part of the treatment of some chronic diseases and cancer, regulation of insulin levels, managing the work of the diaphragm, heart muscle, artificial hearts, cochlear prostheses, neuroprostheses, etc.
Stentrode like biocompatible neuroprostheses would induce a paradigm shift in the approach towards motor rehabilitation and lead to improved quality of life for the afflicted patients.
However, the use of implanted neuroprostheses and EMG sensors is growing [30-34], increasing the possibility that an implanted EMG system will be attractive as a computer interface for controlling environmental control units and other assistive systems, such as functional electrical stimulation neuroprostheses and service robots.
The brain-computer interfaces gives to these users possibility to switch on and off different devices [3, 4, 5], to run computer programs, to operate word-processing programs or neuroprostheses [6, 7, 8].
Grossman, Human-Centered Design of Wearable Neuroprostheses and Exoskeletons, discusses state-of-the-art techniques for brain-machine interfaces that assist people in walking.
"What blindness can tell us about seeing again: merging neuroplasticity and neuroprostheses." Nature Reviews Neuroscience 6.1 (2005): 71-77.