neuroplasticity


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neuroplasticity

(no͝or′ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The ability of the brain to change in structure or function in response to experience.

neu′ro·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

neuroplasticity

(nūr″ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē)
The ability of the nervous system to adapt to trauma or disease; the ability of nerve cells to grow and form new connections to other neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neuroplasticity: explains how your brain is malleable, how you can enable your mind to flourish and grow as a positive, productive, passionate and 'philanthropic' member of society.
Neuroplasticity is about changing the brain to efficiently support what the brain is doing with regularity.
FRIDAY, May 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Physical therapy promotes the recovery of arm function and neuroplasticity in all chronic stroke patients, according to a study published online April 25 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
My Plastic Brain: One Woman's Yearlong Journey to Discover if Science Can Improve Her Mind tells of the author's year-long effort to explore the idea of neuroplasticity, or the brain's ability to make new neural pathways to change how it operates.
The authors have discussed epigenetics, neuroplasticity, meditation, and Music therapy in the book.
Dark Chocolate (70% Organic Cacao) Increases Acute and Chronic EEG Power Spectral Density ([eth]-v2) Response of Gamma Frequency (25-40Hz) for Brain Health: Enhancement of Neuroplasticity, Neural Synchrony, Cognitive Processing, Learning, Memory, Recall, and Mindfulness Meditation
By implementing repetitive methods rementia enables the brain to "heal" itself by making new pathways through a process known as neuroplasticity.
Schwartz and Sharon Begley, in their fascinating book, 'The Mind and the Brain, Neuroplasticity and the Power of Mental Force,' explained: 'This dogma held that if the brain sustained injury through stroke or trauma, then other regions could not step up to the plate and pinch-hit.
The brain wires itself using a process called neuroplasticity. Needed connections form in response to the environment.
Several surveys have been conducted in an effort to describe the underlying mechanism of depression in T2DM, including the inflammatory theory [5], the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation theory [6], and the reduced neuroplasticity theory [7].
Zhao et al., "Effect of Hypoxic Injury in Mood Disorder"), as summarized in another review, and in addition to hypoxic injury to neurons, such injury also affects neuroplasticity in many of these same brain regions.