neuro-ophthalmology

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neuro-ophthalmology

 [noor″o-of″thal-mol´o-je]
the branch of ophthalmology dealing with portions of the nervous system related to the eye.

neuro-ophthalmology

(nū″rō-ŏf″thăl-mŏl′ŏ-jē) [″ + ophthalmos, eye, + logos, word, reason]
The branch of ophthalmology concerned with the neurology of the visual system.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tim Matthews, consultant neuroophthalmologist at QEHB, said: "It was a pleasure to cycle Velo Birmingham alongside my colleagues from the Eye Department at QEHB.
The RAPD in patients with OTS was observed in swinging flash light test by experienced neuroophthalmologist (A.M.) and/or RAPDx[R] (Konan Medical, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) automated pupillography.
In response to this situation, pediatric neuroophthalmologist Mark Borchert, director of both the Eye Birth Defects and Eye Technology Institutes in the Vision Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, realized that a controlled trial of sufficient size was needed to evaluate whether stem cell therapy is effective at improving optic nerve function in children with ONH.
Bilateral optic disc swelling needs urgent referral to a neuroophthalmologist opinion as MRI scanning may need to be arranged, even in the absence of vision disturbance.
Thanks for invaluable assistance with this article to Mike Burden, Neuroophthalmologist at Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham and Dr Leon Davies, Aston University, Birmingham.
Once all other clinical possibilities that could explain the optic neuritis have been ruled out, the patient should be referred to the neurologist or neuroophthalmologist as soon as possible for further tests, such as MRI and CSF analyses, and early immunomodulatory treatment for MS if appropriate.
Manatee/Sarasota Eye Clinic's physicians include Murray Friedberg, M.D., a fellowship-trained cataract surgeon and LASIK specialist; Walter Moscoso, M.D., a fellowship-trained retina specialist; Robert Edelman, M.D., a fellowship-trained glaucoma specialist and cataract surgeon; Scott Silverman, M.D., a fellowship-trained pediatric ophthalmologist and eye muscle surgeon; Eric Berman, M.D., a fellowship-trained neuroophthalmologist and oculoplastic surgeon; and Claiborne Callahan, M.D., a comprehensive ophthalmologist and cataract surgeon.
Laura Balcer, assistant professor of Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, emphasizes the importance of consulting your physician, neurologist, or neuroophthalmologist at the first sign of vision problems: "It's important to determine whether or not the symptoms are really MS related, and to explore immediate treatment options." And Dr.
Table 2 shows the number of participants predicted to be either safe or unsafe to drive by the two neuroophthalmologists. The level of agreement between the neuroophthalmologists in their driving safety predictions was only fair ([kappa] = 0.28), with neuroophthalmologist 1 predicting that 9/16 (56%) of the patients would be unsafe, while neuroophthalmologist 2 predicted that only 5/16 (31%) of the patients would be unsafe to drive.
Importantly, there was also a lack of agreement between the two neuroophthalmologists in terms of their clinical predictions of participants' driving safety, with neuro ophthalmologist 1 predicting much higher levels of unsafe driving than did neuroophthalmologist 2.
TABLE 2: Predictions of driver safety by the two neuroophthalmologists. Neuroophthalmologist 2 Safe Unsafe Neuroophthalmologist 1 Safe 6 1 Unsafe 5 4 TABLE 3: The ability of the two neuroophthalmologists to predict a range of driving outcomes.
Two experienced neuroophthalmologists viewed a summary report of the CT/MRI scans of 16 participants with homonymous hemianopic or quadrantanopic field defects which indicated the site and extent of the lesion and they made predictions regarding whether participants would be safe/unsafe to drive.