neuromuscular blocking agents

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neu·ro·mus·cu·lar block·ing a·gents

a group of drugs that prevents motor nerve endings from exciting skeletal muscle. They act either by competing for the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (for example, D-tubocurarine, mivacurium, and pancuronium), or by first stimulating the postjunctional muscle membrane and subsequently desensitizing the muscle endplates to acetylcholine (for example, succinylcholine or decamethonium); used in surgery to produce paralysis and facilitate manipulation of muscles.

neu·ro·mus·cu·lar block·ing a·gents

(nūrō-mŭskyū-lăr bloking ājĕnts)
Drugs that prevent motor nerve endings from exciting skeletal muscle.

neuromuscular

pertaining to nerve terminations in muscles.

neuromuscular blockade
deliberate paralysis of the motor end-plates; important in veterinary surgery for immobilization. It is effected by the use of competitive (non-depolarizing) agents such as d-tubocurarine, and depolarizing agents such as succinylcholine.
neuromuscular blocking agents
drugs capable of producing neuromuscular blockade (above).
neuromuscular junction
the point of junction of a nerve fiber with the muscle that it innervates. It includes an area of folded sarcolemma of the muscle fiber, and an axon terminal located in the folds and containing vesicles of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Called also myoneural junction.
neuromuscular junction disease
examples are tick paralysis, botulism, myasthenia gravis.
neuromuscular paralysis
paralysis caused by malfunction at the neuromuscular junction, e.g. after administration of a neuromuscular blocking agent. The paralysis may be flaccid or spastic.
phase-II neuromuscular block
alteration of the end-plate threshold to depolarization by acetylcholine following prolonged use of a depolarization agent such as succinylcholine.
neuromuscular spindle
consists of muscle fiber, afferent and efferent nerve endings and connective tissue; maintains muscle tone via stretch reflex mediated through two neurons at spinal cord level.
neuromuscular transmission
release of acetylcholine from the nerve ending and activation of the receptors in the muscle end-plate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The potential for morbidity and mortality due to neuromuscular-blocking drugs has been known for some time, yet postoperative residual blockade remains common, apparently occurring on a daily basis in most hospital (4,5,18).