neurolaw


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neurolaw

(noor′ō-law, nūr′) [″ + ″]
That branch of the system of justice that treats problems resulting from injuries or illnesses of the central or peripheral nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Morse, Avoiding Irrational Neurolaw Exuberance: A Plea for Neuromodesty, 62 MERCER L.
Although concerns have been expressed about what Tallis (2011) has termed "neuromania"--the view that the complexity of human consciousness can be reduced to neural activity--neuroscience research methods are nevertheless being applied to an array of new fields, such as neuroaesthetics, neurotheology, neurolaw, neuroeconomics, and neuroeducation, to name a few.
(49) Stephan Schleim, Brains in Context in the Neurolaw Debate: The Examples of Free Will and "Dangerous" Brains, 35 INT'L J.L.
LAW firm Hugh James has appointed Ciaran McCabe as a partner to work in its neurolaw team.
programs; (25) and multiple websites make neurolaw news available to the
Shen, The Law and Neuroscience Bibliography: Navigating the Emerging Field of Neurolaw, 38 Int'l J.
neuromarketing to neurolaw, and often without sufficient critical
Neurolaw (265 pages) is published by Clark Boardman Callahan and sells for $145 ATLA member/$165 non-ATLA member.
(122) Peter McKnight, 'Neurolaw' Changes the Landscape of Criminal Responsibility--Or Does It?, VANCOUVER SUN (Dec.