neuroglycopenia


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neu·ro·gly·co·pe·ni·a

(nū'rō-glī-kō-pē'nē-ă),
Neurologic sequelae of low serum glucose levels, including seizures and coma.
[neuro- + glycopenia]

neuroglycopenia

/neu·ro·gly·co·pe·nia/ (noor″o-gli″ko-pe´ne-ah) chronic hypoglycemia of a degree sufficient to impair brain function, resulting in personality changes and intellectual deterioration.

neuroglycopenia

(nur?o-gli-ko-pe'ne-a)
Hypoglycemia of sufficient duration and degree to interfere with normal brain metabolism. Patients with an insulinoma or hypoglycemia due to an insulin overdose may have this condition, which produces confusion, agitation, coma, or brain damage. Synonym: glucopenic brain injury
References in periodicals archive ?
Long periods without meals may lead to neuroglycopenia [low glucose levels in brain] and compromise mental function in children.
Clinical symptoms of cerebral malaria mimic diabetic ketoacidosis and severe neuroglycopenia.
We present a case of sporadic insulinoma in a yo ung, 24-year-old female patient, who presented witl a 2-month history of episodic shaking, diaphoresis increased hunger, confusion, obtundation and fainting Symptoms of neuroglycopenia were predominant, sc the family members reported that the patient has un dergone a personality change.
Patients with insulinoma have symptoms of hypoglycemia resulting from neuroglycopenia and increased catecholamine release.
In addition, a growing number of Roux-en-Y patients are showing neuroglycopenia and diabetes recurrence several years after surgery, which is concerning.
There may be other issues that are neurological, such as whether neuroglycopenia from repeat hypoglycemia is having some kind of effect.
Severe hypoglycemic episodes may be associated with sufficient neuroglycopenia to induce seizure or coma.
Less commonly, cognitive impairment due to neuroglycopenia (lack of glucose in the brain) can occur due to very low blood sugars.
The second pathophysiologic process is a result of neuroglycopenia, which can lead to difficulty thinking, confusion, weakness, motor deficits, seizures, and loss of consciousness (Cryer et al.
Symptoms of neuroglycopenia suggest a patient is experiencing hypoglycemia unawareness; so do hypoglycemic symptoms occurring at a blood glucose level of less than 60 mg/dL.
Furthermore, many diabetic patients, particularly those with type 1 diabetes, lose the autonomic warning symptoms that usually precede neuroglycopenia ("hypoglycemic unawareness") (52), increasing the risk of hypoglycemia.