neurogenic claudication


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neurogenic claudication

claudication with neurologic compromise, usually in association with lumbar spinal stenosis.

neu·ro·gen·ic clau·di·ca·tion

(nūr'ō-jen'ik klaw'di-kā'shŭn)
Claudication with neurologic injury, usually in association with lumbar spinal stenosis.

neurogenic claudication

Leg pain or numbness that occurs with standing or walking and is relieved by sitting or resting with the spine flexed. It is typically caused by lumbar disk disease.
See also: claudication
References in periodicals archive ?
All patients were treated in a rehabilitation unit for four weeks and indicated for surgery due to neurogenic claudication that can not be managed by physical therapy or medication.
Clinical characteristics of LSS include pains such as leg pain while walking and lower extremity weakness, referred as to neurogenic claudication. Along with these symptoms, they also cover pain in leg segments applicable to the lumbar nerve root, as well as numbness, weakness, and loss of reflexes.1 Facet Joint Syndrome (FJS), a type of degenerative spondylosis, is one of the most common causes of Low Back Pain (LBP).
[17] found a PCS improvement of 40% in 53 IPD-treated patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication followed for 2 years.
Neurogenic claudication (NC) is the clinical syndrome associated with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS).
As reported in several radiological and cadaveric studies, IPDs have an effect on soft central and foraminal stenosis, because their action is effective on ligamentous buckling and hypertrophy, with good clinical results on neurogenic claudication in the early stage of the postoperative period.
The clinical presentation is indistinguishable from the typical lumber disc herniation and varies from simple backache to cauda equina syndrome.11,12 Most of our patients (54.5%) had radicular symptoms, followed by cauda equina syndrome (27.3%) and neurogenic claudication (18.2%).
Self-rated evaluation of outcome of the implantation of interspinous process distraction (x-stop) for neurogenic claudication. European Spine Journal, 17, 200-203.
It is particularly important to differentiate the neurogenic claudication of LSS from vascular claudication, as the treatments are vastly different (TABLE).
According to this study, TCAs appear to be effective in controlling lumbar spinal stenosis symptoms (neurogenic claudication and back and leg pain) in this patient population.
Edward Benzel, who diagnosed neurogenic claudication and lumbar stenosis.
(i) IPDs, as described by the authors, have as their primary indication the stenosis associated with moderate neurogenic claudication and/or radiculopathy regressing with the anterior flexion of the trunk.
The symptom most commonly attributed to LSS is neurogenic claudication. Neurogenic claudication refers to leg symptoms encompassing the buttock, groin, and anterior thigh, as well as radiation down the posterior part of the leg to the feet.