Neuroeconomics


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A discipline which takes its cue from economics, neuroscience and psychology to study how people make decisions, stratify risks and rewards, and interact with each other, in particular regarding finances
References in periodicals archive ?
The behavioral economics and neuroeconomics of reinforcer pathologies: Implications for etiology and treatment of addiction.
(17.) Thus, Hall, Wisdom, 16, writes, "[A] lot of recent research in neuroeconomics and (in a broader sense) social neuroscience--including related fields like cognitive neuroscience, behavioral psychology, moral philosophy, and the like--strikes me as an immensely fertile area to till for fresh new insights into the nature of wisdom." For Hall, the vocabulary of human virtue reduces to "the eight neural pillars of wisdom" (19, 59).
Abstract This paper discusses the implications of neuroeconomics with respect to behavioral attitudes toward the interpretation of current economic events.
a striking example from the neuroeconomics literature, tourists maimed
The somatic marker framework as a neurological theory of decision-making: Review, conceptual comparisons, and future neuroeconomics research.
With the rapid development of the interdisciplinary field of neuroeconomics, experimental economic games have been widely adopted to explore decision-making behavior while interacting with others in economic contexts (Sanfey, 2007).
Fehr (Eds.), Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and The Brain (pp.
Table 1: Compilation of neuromarketing definitions Author Business category Academic category Kenning & Neuromarketing is a branch Plassmann of the general field of (20050 neuroeconomics, which is an interdisciplinary field that combines economics, neuroscience and also psychology, to study the brain function in decision-making situations.
Prelec, "Neuroeconomics: How Neuroscience Can Inform Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, 43(1), 2005, pp.
Although concerns have been expressed about what Tallis (2011) has termed "neuromania"--the view that the complexity of human consciousness can be reduced to neural activity--neuroscience research methods are nevertheless being applied to an array of new fields, such as neuroaesthetics, neurotheology, neurolaw, neuroeconomics, and neuroeducation, to name a few.