neurodevelopmental disorder

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Related to Neurodevelopmental disorders: Neurodevelopmental Treatment, Neurodegenerative disease

neurodevelopmental disorder

(no͝or′ō-dĭ-vĕl′əp-mĕn′tl, nyo͝or′ō-)
n.
Any of various conditions, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, intellectual disability, and learning disabilities, that begin in childhood and involve impairments in neurological functioning that affect behavior, cognition, or motor skills.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some aspects of our understanding seem to be "no brainers," and the continuation of child neurodevelopmental disorders morphing into adult mental disorders should be obvious.
Neurodevelopmental disorders is a disorder of brain function that affects emotion, learning ability, self-control and memory and that unfolds as an individual develops and grows.
The new catalogue, which still needs to be approved by UN member countries, so-called "gender incongruence" is now listed under "conditions related to sexual health", instead of "mental, behavioral and neurodevelopmental disorders".
She said her organisation 'Shuchona Foundation', a non-profit advocacy, research and capacity-building organisation specialising in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) and mental health, has been working for persons with NDDs by developing innovative, low-cost, sustainable programmes through public and private partnerships.
OV101 is a delta-selective GABAA receptor agonist that targets the disruption of tonic inhibition, a central physiological process of the brain that is thought to be the underlying cause of Fragile X syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Ovid recently completed a Phase 1 PK and safety study in patients with Fragile X syndrome and Angelman syndrome, demonstrating that OV101 has a similar safety and tolerability profile in adolescents as in young adults.
Researchers also discovered some of the genes identified as increasing risk for schizophrenia have previously been associated with other neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders.
Disrupted fetal immune system development, such as that caused by viral infection in the mother, may be a key factor in the later appearance of certain neurodevelopmental disorders. This finding emerges from a Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel, study that may explain, among other things, how the mother's infection with the cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy, which affects her own and her fetus' immune system, increases the risk that her offspring will develop autism or schizophrenia, sometimes years later.
Neurodevelopmental disorders refer to developmental, cognitive function, motor function, verbal communication, social skill, and behavioral disorders.
(2) The second study reported associations between preterm birth, vaccination, and neurodevelopmental disorders. (3) As is typical of epidemiologic studies, Mawson and colleagues used chi-square tests, odds ratios, and 95% Confidence Intervals in evaluating their null hypothesis: "If the effects of vaccination on health were limited to protection against the targeted pathogens as is assumed to be the case, no difference in outcomes would be expected between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups except for reduced rates of the targeted infectious diseases."
University of Oregon education professor Laura Lee McIntyre will speak on "A Spectrum of Promise: a Multidisciplinary Approach to Autism and other Neurodevelopmental Disorders." Her presentation, part of an ongoing series hosted by the Phil and Penny Knight Campus for Accelerating Scientific Impact, will highlight how early identification of developmental disorders can lead to promising intervention and prevention strategies.
The research also added that the high levels of testosterone during pregnancy have been reported to increase the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders, such as ADHD and autism, in children.
Chris Oliver, director of the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders at University of Birmingham, said: "People with learning difficulties may be unable to describe how they are feeling and others may think that changes in behaviour and emotions are caused by things other than anxiety and depression.