neurocardiogenic syncope


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Related to neurocardiogenic syncope: vasovagal syncope

syncope

 [sing´kah-pe]
faint. adj. adj syn´copal, syncop´ic.
cardiac syncope sudden loss of consciousness, either with momentary premonitory symptoms or without warning, due to cerebral anemia caused by ventricular asystole, extreme bradycardia, or ventricular fibrillation.
laryngeal syncope tussive syncope.
neurocardiogenic syncope a particularly serious type of vasovagal attack; the etiology is unknown.
stretching syncope syncope associated with stretching the arms upward with the spine extended.
swallow syncope syncope associated with swallowing, a disorder of atrioventricular conduction mediated by the vagus nerve.
tussive syncope brief loss of consciousness associated with paroxysms of coughing.
vasovagal syncope vasovagal attack.

neurocardiogenic syncope

A syncope with a psychogenic substrate and predisposition to bradycardia, hypotension and peripheral vasodilation.
 
Clinical findings
Abrupt loss of vascular tone; nausea; diaphoresis; pallor.
 
Diagnosis
Tilt test, in which the patient is placed on a tilt table at a 40º to 80º angle from horizontal and maintained in a motionless upright position for 10–15 minutes or more.
 
Management
Beta blockers—e.g., metoprolol, theophylline, disopyramide.

Mechanism
Uncertain; probably activation of myocardial mechanoreceptors (C fibres), with decreased efferent sympathetic tone and increased efferent parasympathetic tone.

neurocardiogenic syncope

Vasovagal syncope A syncope with a psychogenic substrate, and predisposition to bradycardia, hypotension, peripheral vasodilation, syncope Clinical Abrupt loss of vascular tone, nausea, diaphoresis, pallor Treatment Beta blockers–eg, metoprolol, theophylline, disopyramide
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a lower observed rate of overall neurocardiogenic syncope, and specifically, lower rates of a mixed and cardioinhibitory response in our black patients undergoing tilt-table testing.
Use of sertraline in the treatment of refractory neurocardiogenic syncope in children and adolescents.
The implementation of the tilt test in 1986 as a diagnostic tool for unexplained syncope, established to the neurocardiogenic syncope as the most common cause of recurrent fainting in the general population.
Neurocardiogenic syncope was far and away the most common diagnosis, accounting for 70% of all diagnoses.
"From 30% to 50% of all kids are going to have a positive tilt test, regardless of whether they've got neurocardiogenic syncope or not, so to use that test to exclude other causes of syncope is, I think, a mistake," the pediatric cardiologist told this newspaper.
He was later diagnosed with neurocardiogenic syncope, also known as vasovagal syndrome, which affects the heart rate and blood pressure.