neuroblast

(redirected from Neuroblasts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

neuroblast

 [noor´o-blast]
an embryonic cell from which nervous tissue is formed.

neu·ro·blast

(nū'rō-blast),
An embryonic nerve cell.
[neuro- + G. blastos, germ]

neuroblast

/neu·ro·blast/ (noor´o-blast) an embryonic cell that develops into a nerve cell or neuron.

neuroblast

(no͝or′ə-blăst′, nyo͝or′-)
n.
An embryonic cell from which a nerve cell develops.

neuroblast

[noo͡r′əblast]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + blastos, germ
any embryonic cell that develops into a functional neuron; an immature nerve cell. neuroblastic, adj.

neu·ro·blast

(nūr'ō-blast)
An embryonic nerve cell.
[neuro- + G. blastos, germ]

neuroblast

A cell in the embryo that gives rise to nerve cells.

neuroblast

the cell that subsequently forms a neurone.

neuroblast

an embryonic cell from which nervous tissue is formed.
References in periodicals archive ?
We investigated the production of GALNAC-Ts in the IGR-N-91 neuroblastoma experimental model, which offered the opportunityto compare neuroblastoma cell lines established from a primary tumor (PTX) and matched metastatic neuroblasts (BM).
Subventricular zone-derived neuroblasts migrate and differentiate into mature neurons in the post-stroke adult striatum.
In a preliminary report published on the Lancet web site, French investigators reported that grafting fetal neuroblast cells into the brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD) appears to improve both motor and cognitive function.
Differentially expressed genes for primary tumor xenograft (PTX; stage 4 disease) and BM or Myoc metastatic neuroblasts.
The fetal adrenal gland is composed primarily of neuroblasts, with an inconspicuous amount of pheochromoblasts.
Peschanski M, Cesaro P, Hantraye P: Rationale for intrastriatal grafting of striatal neuroblasts in patients with Huntington's disease.
Using oligomicroarray transcriptome analysis, we identified a set of 107 genes that were differentially expressed in the metastatic neuroblasts.
As their names indicate, the least differentiated lesion, neuroblastoma, contains primitive neuroblasts, whereas the better differentiated, ganglioneuroma, contains mature Schwann and ganglion cells.
17-20,75-77] In contrast, the poorly differentiated, actively proliferating neoplastic neuroblasts in the surrounding reticulin-rich/ solid areas of tumor exhibit lesser degrees of [Beta]III labeling[18,20] Moreover, neuronal tumors are GFAP negative, aside from reactive or stromal astroglial proliferations.