brain implant

(redirected from Neural implants)

brain im·plant

(brān im'plant)
Any substance or structure that is placed surgically intracranially.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

brain implant

Any substance, tissue, or object placed surgically in the brain.
See also: implant
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The advancement of neural implants to enhance persons' memory is facilitating the fashioning of cyborgs (human-machine fusions) having enhanced capacities (Reinares-Lara et al., 2018).
"Our original inspiration was to make a conformable transistor for neural implants," Gelinas notes.
They say the next step is to link these cavemen brains to robots using neural implants to try and create a kind of Neanderthal cyborg.
The hope is to enable safer neural implants and gather more accurate neural readings to learn about diseases and other brain conditions.
Browse Bio-MEMS Market by Product Type (Accelerometers and Gyroscopes), and Application (Bionics, Cardio-MEMS, ENT Implants, Microsurgical Tools, Neural Implants, Point-of-Care, Tissue Engineering) and Forecast 2017-2021 at https://www.ihealthcareanalyst.com/report/healthcare-bio-mems-market/
Now, for the first time ever, scientists and researchers have successfully used neural implants to help a person feel touch on a prosthetic limb.
Now a post-doctoral scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the 28-yearold's research is focused on building neural implants for the treatment of brain disorders, disability and immunodisorders.
The second class of projects is the electrical interface of the body, the development of neural implants where there can be a communication between the nervous system of the prosthetic user and the prosthesis itself.
Researchers at UCSF aren't exactly strangers to the medtech space, having recently been awarded $26 million in government funding to study neural implants for Parkinson's disease and epilepsy.
RH: How far away do you think we are from using neural implants to monitor health and safety of patients that are home-bound or who suffer from terminal or catastrophic illnesses?