tic

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tic

 [tik] (Fr.)
an involuntary, compulsive, rapid, repetitive, stereotyped movement or vocalization, experienced as irresistible although it can be suppressed for some length of time; occurrence is increased by stress and reduced during sleep or engrossing activities. Tics may be of psychogenic or neurogenic origin and are subclassified as either simple, such as eye blinking, shoulder shrugging, coughing, grunting, snorting, or barking; or complex, such as facial gestures, grooming motions, coprolalia (obscene language), echolalia (repeating the most recently heard word or sound), or echokinesis (imitation of another's movements).
tic douloureux a painful disorder of the trigeminal nerve, characterized by severe pain in the face and forehead on the affected side, extending to the midline of the face and head, triggered by stimuli such as cold drafts, chewing, drinking cold liquids, brushing the hair, or washing the face. Called also trigeminal neuralgia.

Treatment. Medical treatment is usually preferred, since surgical correction results in complete loss of sensation in the areas served by the nerve. The drugs employed include trichloroethylene administered by inhalation, niacin, potassium chloride, diethazine, and most recently carbamazepine. When surgery is resorted to, the patient must be watched for signs of corneal infection, which frequently occurs, usually because of loss of the corneal reflex, which normally provides a warning when foreign material or other injurious agents enter the eye. Postoperative instructions must be given so that the patient can take necessary measures for the protection of the eye after discharge from the hospital.
facial tic spasm of the facial muscles.

tic

(tik), Do not confuse this word with tick.
Habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods, for example, clearing the throat, sniffing, pursing the lips, excessive blinking; especially prominent when the person is under stress; there is no known pathologic substrate.
See also: spasm.
[Fr.]

tic

(tik) [Fr.] an involuntary, compulsive, rapid, repetitive, stereotyped movement or vocalization, experienced as irresistible although it can be suppressed for some length of time.
tic douloureux  (doo-loo-rdbobr´) trigeminal neuralgia.
facial tic  see under spasm.
habit tic  any tic that is psychogenic in origin.

tic

(tĭk)
n.
1. A repetitive, rapid, sudden muscular movement or vocalization, usually experienced as involuntary or semivoluntary.
2. A quirk or habit of behavior or language: common phrases that have become verbal tics.
intr.v. ticced, ticcing, tics
To have a tic; produce tics: factors that affect the frequency of ticcing.

tic

A sudden, repetitive, stereotyped, nonrhythmic movement—motor tic—or sound—phonic tic—involving discrete muscle groups, which may be invisible to the observer—e.g., abdominal tensing
Common tics Eye blinking, throat clearing
DiffDx Chorea, dystonia, myoclonus, autism and stereotypic movement disorder, compulsive movements of OCD and seizure activity

tic

Habit spasm A complex of multiple abrupt, coordinated involuntary and/or compulsive spasms, including eye blinking, facial gestures, vocalizations, shoulder shrugging, etc which, when controlled, may be followed by more intense and frequent 'rebound' contractions; tics may be exacerbated by stress and ameliorated by psychotherapy. See Dystonic tic, Motor tic, Tourette syndrome, Transient tic disorder, Verbal tic, Vocal tic. Cf Jumping Frenchmen of Maine syndrome Medtalk A popular synonym for diverticulosis.

tic

(tik)
Habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods (e.g., clearing the throat, sniffing, pursing the lips, excessive blinking); especially prominent when the person is under stress; there is no known pathologic substrate.
See also: spasm
Synonym(s): Brissaud disease, habit spasm.
[Fr.]

Tic

Brief and intermittent involuntary movement or sound.
Mentioned in: Tourette Syndrome

Brissaud,

Edouard, French physician, 1852-1909.
Brissaud disease - habitual, repeated contraction of certain muscles, resulting in actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods. Synonym(s): tic
Brissaud infantilism - Synonym(s): infantile hypothyroidism
Brissaud reflex - tickling the sole causes a contraction of the tensor fasciae latae muscle, even when there is no responsive movement of the toes.
Brissaud-Marie syndrome - unilateral spasm of the tongue and lips, of hysterical nature.

tic

involuntary, repeated muscle spasm

tic

(tik)
Habitual, repeated contraction of some muscles, resulting in stereotyped individualized actions that can be voluntarily suppressed for only brief periods, e.g., clearing the throat, sniffing.
[Fr.]

tic,

n an involuntary, purposeless movement of muscle, usually occurring under emotional stress. It is a survival in stereotyped form of a movement or muscle set once used voluntarily and purposefully.
tic douloureux,
n spontaneous trigeminal neuralgia associated with a “trigger zone” and causing spasmodic contraction of the facial muscles. See also neuralgia, trigeminal.

tic

a spasmodic twitching movement made involuntarily by muscles that are ordinarily under voluntary control. In dogs, the myoclonus associated with infection by distemper virus is sometimes called a tic or chorea.

Patient discussion about tic

Q. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. My brothers eczema is very vulnerable to allergens. In spite of steps taken to eliminate this we have not succeeded much. His medicines do not help him. They cannot cure this immune disorder. They have started showing some side effects. His fight for eczema tic itching starts again once he stops his medicines. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. If any diet can help then please guide?

A. Though food can also trigger eczema symptoms. Thus you must avoid cow`s milk, eggs, shellfish. Avoid dusty areas, pollution. His doctor would have told about the allergens to be avoided just follow them. You can also make him have raw food. It’s said that they help reduce on the return of the symptoms. Use anything as natural as possible, like soaps, clothing and anything which is unnatural. This will help for the eczematic impact to reduce.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OUi3KAUCog&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v6OUi3KAUCog_eczema_tips?q=eczema&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about tic
References in periodicals archive ?
Humour has a long history of gags about drunkenness, big boobs and even bigger bottoms, grim mothers-in-law and nagging wives, nervous tics and twitches, stammering, lisping and being stupid, fat or ugly.
They became very quiet anddeveloped nervous tics and things.
Run through interview FAQs at home - with a friend or in front of the mirror - and tame those nervous tics.
Even better news is that he doesn't portray the affliction with the usual "luvvie" repertoire of nervous tics and scene-stealing idiosyncrasies so beloved of the Oscars, which is what tends to happen when big-name stars play psychologically-damaged yet somehow genius creatures, as with Dustin Hoffman's Rain Man, Tom Hank's Forrest Gump, or Russell Crowe's troubled maths boffin in A Beautiful Mind.
Like Inspector Clousseau's hapless boss Dreyfuss he should be amass of nervous tics by now, but nothing could be further from the truth.
The most memorable contestant in the film's motley crew of eight is Harry Altman, whose nervous tics and machine-gun gags invariably steal the show.
The most memorable contestant in the film's motley crew of eight is Harry Altman, a quixotic child comedian whose nervous tics and machine-gun gags invariably steal the show.
ROY (Nicholas Cage) is a most unlikely con man: an obsessive compulsive,chain- smoking mass of insecurity with various nervous tics, who cannot leave his house without opening and closing each door three times.
We see them now, as they meet again at a London train station, rather grown-up and subdued, and we see them then - in funky flashbacks to the '80s, with their punk fashions and Gothic music - as unformed and neurotic college kids, both of them a passel of nervous tics.
Run through frequently asked questions at home - either with a friend or in front of the mirror - and tame those nervous tics.
Presented by expert Peter Collett who used to do the science bits on Big Brother, so he obviously knows what he's talking about it explains the real meaning behind people's nervous tics and fidgets.