axonotemesis

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axonotemesis

nerve injury characterized by peripheral nerve axon damage, without damage to the neural sheath; axons distal to the point of injury undergo initial degeneration but will ultimately regrow distally, within the intact nerve sheath (contrast with neuropraxia and neurotmesis)
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Our innovations to address spinal cord injuries came directly from a quarter century of nerve-transfer work in nerve injury," Mackinnon said.
On the flip side, mice that were genetically unable to produce BH4 in their sensory nerves had decreased pain hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury.
Pruszynski explained that after a nerve injury, when one is working towards regrowing the peripheral nerves in order to recover the function of touch, it is important to consider two things.
The mechanisms of traumatic nerve injury are varied.
Rat models of nerve injury are the most prevalent type used in studies designed to evaluate nerve regeneration (3), and they serve as a basis for studies aimed at seeking new forms of treatment as well as those intended to improve understanding of the neurophysiological mechanisms by which drugs act in the treatment of such conditions.
The study, "Therapeutic effect of adipose-derived stem cells and BDNF-immobilized PLGA membrane in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury," is published in the current issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine (JSM), among the top 10% most-cited journals in Urology,* and the Official Journal of the International Society for Sexual Medicine.
Here, we aimed to analyze the demographical, clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with sciatic nerve injury following gluteal intramuscular injections and to summarize the legal procedure in Turkey.
Among complications associated with phlebotomy, nerve injury is relatively rare but is potentially serious and often results in malpractice lawsuits.
Nerve injury associated with anaesthesia can cause significant functional disability or pain syndromes, and often results from malpositioning of patients on operating tables with stretch and/or compression of nerves (1).
The severity of facial paresis and the recovery outcome depend on the site of facial nerve injury, with the greater damage observed with an injury more proximal to the cell bodies.
The concomitant facial nerve injury described here is a rare event but should be kept in mind as a possible finding and treated aggressively.
Summary: Chelsea captain John Terry fears that a long-term nerve injury in his leg could sideline him for months.