neoplasia

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neoplasia

 [ne″o-pla´zhah]
the formation of a neoplasm.
cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) dysplasia of the cervical epithelium, often premalignant, characterized by various degrees of hyperplasia, abnormal keratinization, and the presence of condylomata.
multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) a group of rare hereditary disorders of autonomous hyperfunction of more than one endocrine gland. In Type I (MEN I), called also Wermer's syndrome, there are tumors of the pituitary, parathyroid gland, and pancreatic islet cells in association with a high incidence of peptic ulcer. Type II (MEN II), called also Sipple's syndrome, is characterized by medullary carcinoma of the thyroid, pheochromocytoma, often bilateral and multiple, and parathyroid hyperplasia. Type III (MEN III), called also mucosal neuroma syndrome, resembles Type II except that parathyroid hyperplasia is rare, the mean survival time is shorter, and there may be neuromas and neurofibromas. All forms are transmitted as autosomal dominant traits.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă),
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

neoplasia

(nē′ō-plā′zhə)
n.
1. Formation of new tissue.
2. Formation of a neoplasm or neoplasms.

neoplasia

 Oncology Abnormal and uncontrolled cell growth. See Anal intraepithelial neoplasia, Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, Ductal intraepithelial neoplasia, Hereditary neoplasia, Hereditary preneoplasia, Papillary neoplasia, Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia.

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in the formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

neoplasia

The process of tumour formation.

Neoplasia

Abnormal growth of cells, which may lead to a neoplasm, or tumor.
Mentioned in: Pap Test

ne·o·pla·si·a

(nē'ō-plā'zē-ă)
The pathologic process that results in formation and growth of a neoplasm.
[neo- + G. plasis, a molding]

Patient discussion about neoplasia

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about neoplasia
References in periodicals archive ?
The p53 centrality in neoplastic processes stimulates the search for an anticancer therapy model from this gene (FETT-CONT & SALLES, 2002; ZENG et al., 2011).
Intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal haemorrhages as well as many other congenital, infectious, or neoplastic processes occuring in the vicinity of groin may present within an inguinal hernia.
Additional workup ruled out other causes of granulomatous disease, including tuberculosis and fungi, as well as, neoplastic processes. Therefore, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis involvement of the thyroid and spinal nerve roots was considered.
The differential diagnosis of a submandibular gland mucocele should include the numerous inflammatory, infective, developmental and neoplastic processes affecting the lateral neck.
The clinical laboratory findings described in this study were not suggestive of neoplastic processes, but only reflected the consequences of the neoplastic growth in one dog that had severe loss of blood; these results suggest that routine clinical laboratory evaluations might not be of any diagnostic significance in canine chemodectoma.
This will allow confident differentiation from other conditions that may mimic PVNS, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other inflammatory and neoplastic processes of the synovial lining.
On otoscopic examination, EACC can be difficult to distinguish from other inflammatory, infectious, or neoplastic processes. Keratosis obturans is the most difficult to distinguish, and since EACC may require surgical intervention and keratosis obturans is managed medically, distinguishing between these entities is important.
The differential diagnosis includes infectious, inflammatory, and other neoplastic processes. (22) Infectious etiologies include endophthalmitis secondary to bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections.
The differential diagnosis for inflammation and wall thickening of the terminal ileum is extensive, including inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic processes. In a young adult, the most common etiology is Crohn's disease.
(1) Squamous cell carcinomas of cutaneous or mucosal origin, particularly adenoid cystic carcinomas of major or minor salivary origin, are the most common primary neoplastic processes to spread perineurally, as was seen in the case described here.
Many reactive and inflammatory masses, especially granulomatous lesions, mimic neoplastic processes. Sarcoidosis as an entity has a wide differential diagnosis because it mimics a lot of other granulomatous diseases.[7] The differential diagnosis includes fungal diseases, tuberculosis, collagen vascular diseases, and granulomatous inflammation accompanying various central nervous system lesions.
[4] The clinical presentation of these lesions can be confused with those of infectious, granulomatous, and nonlymphomatous neoplastic processes. [5] The limited clinical experience with this lesion has led to controversy regarding its pathologic classification, natural history, and optimal management.