neoplasm

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neoplasm

 [ne´o-plazm]
tumor; any new and abnormal growth, specifically one in which cell multiplication is uncontrolled and progressive. Neoplasms may be benign or malignant.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm),
An abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. Neoplasms show partial or complete lack of structural organization and functional coordination with the normal tissue, and usually form a distinct mass of tissue that may be either benign (benign tumor) or malignant (cancer).
Synonym(s): new growth, tumor (2)
[neo- + G. plasma, thing formed]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neoplasm

(nē′ə-plăz′əm)
n.
An abnormal new growth of tissue in animals or plants; a tumor.

ne′o·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neoplasm

(1) An abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of normal tissue, and persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli evoking the change.
(2) Any autonomous proliferation of cells, benign or malignant.

Neoplasm classifications
• Behavior—Benign, borderline or malignant. 
• Degree of differentiation—Well differentiated (i.e., the neoplastic cell simulates its parent or progenitor cell) or poorly differentiated (i.e., the neoplastic cell is bizarre and “ugly”, as defined by pathologic criteria).
• Embryologic origin—Epithelial (e.g., adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma), lymphoproliferative (e.g., leukaemia, lymphoma), mesenchymal (e.g., sarcoma). 
• Gross appearance—Well circumscribed or infiltrative: benign neoplasms are usually slow growing, well circumscribed, often with a fibrous capsule, and are symptomatic only if they compromise a confined space (e.g., massive meningioma of the cranial cavity, or encirclement of vital blood vessels); malignancies are often aggressive with increased mitotic activity, bizarre cells, necrosis and invasion of adjacent structures, and have metastatic potential.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

neoplasm

Oncology 'An abnormal mass of tissue, the growth of which exceeds and is uncoordinated with that of normal tissue and persists in the same excessive manner after cessation of the stimuli evoking the change'; an autonomous proliferation of cells, benign or malignant. See Cancer, Doubling time, Intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm of pancreas, Metastases, Papillary & solid neoplasm of pancreas.
Neoplasm classifications
Behavior Benign, borderline or malignant
Degree of differentiation Well-differentiated, ie the neoplastic cell simulates its parent or progenitor cell or poorly-differentiated, ie the neoplastic cell is bizarre and ''ugly', as defined by pathologic criteria'
Embryologic origin Epithelial–eg adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, lymphoproliferative–eg leukemia, lymphoma, mesenchymal–eg sarcoma, histiocytosis, neural crest–eg carcinoid tumor, some small cell carcinomas, etc
Gross appearance Well-circumscribed or infiltrative; benign neoplasms, usually slow-growing, well-circumscribed, often with a fibrous capsule, and are symptomatic only if they compromise a confined space, eg massive meningioma of the cranial cavity, or encirclement of vital blood vessels; malignancies are often aggressive with ↑ mitotic activity, bizarre cells, necrosis and invasion of adjacent structures and have metastatic potential
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm)
An abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. Neoplasms show partial or complete lack of structural organization and functional coordination with the normal tissue, and usually form a distinct mass of tissue which may be either benign (benign tumor) or malignant (cancer).
Synonym(s): tumor (2) .
[G. neo- new + G. plasma, thing formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neoplasm

A collection of cells, derived from a common origin, often a single cell, that is increasing in number and expanding or spreading, either locally or to remote sites. A tumour. Neoplasms may be BENIGN or MALIGNANT. The term literally means a new growth. See also CANCER.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

neoplasm

an autonomous growth of tissue in the body which has no apparent physiological function, such as a TUMOUR.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Neoplasm

An abnormal formation of tissue; for example, a tumor.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·o·plasm

(nē'ō-plazm)
Abnormal tissue that grows by cellular proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease; may be either benign or malignant.
[G. neo- new + G. plasma, thing formed]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about neoplasm

Q. What is a brain tumor?

A. A brain tumour is any intracranial tumor normally either in the brain itself in the cranial nerves, in the brain envelopes, skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or spread from cancers primarily located in other organs (metastatic tumors). It is created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division. Primary (true) brain tumors (which start in the brain) are commonly located in the posterior cranial fossa in children and in the anterior two-thirds of the cerebral hemispheres in adults, although they can affect any part of the brain.

Q. Is this a tumor? I felt a lump in my breast a few days ago in the shower. Is this a Tumor? Help! I'm scared.

A. If you felt a lump in your breast then you should go see your Doctor to check whether or not it is something that could be dangerous.

Q. what is carcinoid tumors? I had my appendix removed and the doctor came in the room very shocked and said it was full of carcinoid tumors. Im scared to get them somewhere else.

A. ya I have pain all the time but the doctors wont give me anything cuz im so young they don't want me hooked on anything. thank you sooo much for being so kind.

More discussions about neoplasm
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