neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
For the new words' acceptance, a vital language and motivated speakers are required, and as we know, the road is long to a complete acceptance of neologisms by any community, even in optimal circumstances.
I am unaware of any systematic study of neologisms in Ezekiel, or any other biblical book.
The term blush--borrowed from English with its secondary meaning (,,cream or powder used for making your cheeks look red or pink" DEA: 186)--is not listed in the Romanian dictionaries of neologisms, though it represents a serious competitor for the Rom.
Gutierrez Rodilla, "La antineologia de la medicina renacentista en castellano: los textos instructivos y de divulgacion" (41-56), demonstrates that medical texts written for the lower ranks of medical practitioners or the non-specialist reader tended to avoid, insofar as possible, the use of Latin and Greek technical neologisms in favor of the terminology employed in everyday speech.
The terms selected from the corpus are regarded as neologisms which are not included in The Concise Dictionary of the Hungarian Language (1978).
Keeping in mind the importance of metaphors in our professional discourse, my purpose for this short article is to focus on the military community's fondness for a particular neologism: "JIIM" (pronounced "gym").
Thomas Dekker's Villanies Discovered by Lanthorne and Candle-Light (1608) observes that English was once "poorest" but "those Noblest Languages lent her Words and phrases, and turning those Borrowings into Good husbandry, she is now as rich in Elocution and as aboundant as her prowdest & Beststored Neighbors." (27) "I marvaile" remarked another Elizabethan defender of neologisms, "how our english tongue hath cracke[d] it[s] credite, that it may not borrow of the Latine" (28) And George Chapman asserted that, "if my country language were an useurer, or a man of this age, speaking it, he would thanke mee for enriching him." (29)
With Italian literature no longer the primary model for Standard use, innovations derive mostly from media sources, with neologisms being created daily.
Four major themes emerge from the seven chapters: (1) the function of neologisms, that is how and why they arise and take the different forms they do; (2) why (as in the volume's title) some neologisms succeed and others fail; (3) discussion of some of the most recent coinings and new usages in the Romance languages, especially Italian and Spanish; (4) attitudes towards neologisms both historically and currently, with some special emphasis on the work of Panzini.
Though some of the writing is turgid because of its technical jargon, on the whole the collection is free of post-modernist neologisms. I recommend it for specialist libraries.
As hitherto this remarkable volume not only lists essential etymological information regarding 'words, names, titles and phrases' but also gives information about the use and implication of neologisms: this is especially useful for those learning English.