neologism

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neologism

 [ne-ol´o-jizm]
a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it; see also word salad.

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ō-jizm),
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (for example, headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the patient's condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

/ne·ol·o·gism/ (ne-ol´ah-jizm) a newly coined word; in psychiatry, a new word whose meaning may be known only to the patient using it.

neologism

(nē-ŏl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. A new word, expression, or usage.
2. Psychology
a. The invention of new words regarded as a symptom of certain psychotic disorders, such as schizophrenia.
b. A word so invented.

ne·ol′o·gist n.
ne·ol′o·gis′tic, ne·ol′o·gis′ti·cal adj.

neologism

[nē·ol′əjiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, neos + logos, word
1 a word or term newly coined or used with a new meaning.
2 (in psychiatry) a word coined by a psychotic or delirious patient that is meaningful only to the patient.

neologism

Neurology/psychiatry A word created by a Pt with a mental disorder or dementia, which includes new usages for standard words and ad hoc substitutes for names forgotten by a Pt; neologisms are created by Pts with schizophrenia and organic mental disorders

ne·ol·o·gism

(nē-ol'ŏ-jizm)
A new word or phrase of the patient's own making often seen in schizophrenia (e.g., headshoe to mean hat), or an existing word used in a new sense; in psychiatry, such usages may have meaning only to the patient or be indicative of the underlying condition.
[neo- + G. logos, word]

neologism

1. A newly coined word or phrase.
2. A meaningless word used by a psychotic person.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the new words' acceptance, a vital language and motivated speakers are required, and as we know, the road is long to a complete acceptance of neologisms by any community, even in optimal circumstances.
I am unaware of any systematic study of neologisms in Ezekiel, or any other biblical book.
Alberto Anula, "Neologismos denotativos de 'golpe' en el espanol aureo" (171-196), proposes that linguists must base their evaluation of the integration of neologisms on frequency of use rather than on the date of first documentation.
The terms selected from the corpus are regarded as neologisms which are not included in The Concise Dictionary of the Hungarian Language (1978).
30) Even the mockery of Don Armados neologisms as "fire-new words" in the same play (1.
agganciare 'raggiungere l'avversario in una competizione sportiva', accartocciato 'ripiegato su se stesso, in un atteggiamento che denota stanchezza, fatica, delusione', as well as the numerous compounds with acchiappa-), only a very small fraction of neologisms found in the more recent volume Neologismi quotidiani (10) by Giovanni Adamo and Valeria Della Valle made their way into the Devoto-Oli 2008.
Sergio Raffaelli's study of the history of neologisms at the hands of the Academy established by Mussolini's Fascist regime to deal with the 'problem' of foreign words in Italian ('La vicenda dei neologismi a corso forzoso nell' Accademia d' Italia',pp.
Neologisms are language segments that raise much more comments and opinions of the media and the so called general public than any other segment.
Guyot excels at showing that Bloy's distorted syntax, neologisms, recondite vocabulary, and taste for the grotesque are not simply inventions and quirks of style, but a conscious and systematic defamiliarization of contemporary literary French by exposing its hidden Latinity, the linguistic "other" at its core.
Please let us know, since we don't want to left "unbolted" in the wonderful world of neologisms.
I begin to wonder if he is not being led up the garden path by current neologisms.
Some of these compound neologisms sound like they have escaped from a cryptogram.