Neo-Darwinism

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Neo-Darwinism

(nē′ō-där′wə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Darwinism as modified by the findings of modern genetics.

Ne′o-Dar·win′i·an (-där-wĭn′ē-ən) adj.
Ne′o-Dar′win·ist n.
References in periodicals archive ?
She asserts "intention" and "motive," daring the neo-Darwinist popularizers of science to prove, on scientific grounds, its absence (197-98).
8) To be sure, such status quo-ism is by no means universal among neo-Darwinists, but its subtle persistence as a philosophical premise sprouts up unexpectedly even when it is expressly disavowed, causing logical stumbles for those who, however unwittingly, take it as a point of departure.
Proponents of Darwinism and neo-Darwinist evolution cannot legitimately claim that their stance is necessarily scientific while claiming that ID necessarily is not.
However as a popular, socio-biological account of human nature and society, which utilises game theory and neo-Darwinist ethology to endorse a post-industrial, enlightened pragmatism, it is perhaps a book of its time.
Monkey Business: A Neo-Darwinist Approach to Ethics Codes," by John Dobson, professor of finance at Orfalea College of Business, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Calif.
Wright mainly draws on soft Marxism, neo-Darwinist evolutionary psychology, anthropological functionalism, and the current fashion to consider power the motor of history.
He represents a neo-Darwinist approach to biology and agrees that science should have an objective view of the world and Christians should reconcile their faith and science.
Barbara Herrnstein Smith's recent discussions of human-animal relations, for example, are so trenchant in their attacks on the neo-Darwinist linguist Steven Pinker--for his reckless application of metaphors from the human realm to the animal, for his apparent disdain for literature and the arts--that her reader might fail to notice that she is, in fact, arguing for the recognition of neo-Darwinian insights about the permeability of the human-animal divide.
In particular, they assume that anyone who believes that biological evolution has a factual, scientific basis must also be convinced of the adequacy of neo-Darwinist theory.
For the readers of this journal, Rolnick's chapters on neo-Darwinist understandings of the person and the questions about human soul and mind raised by modern neurology may be of most interest.
Moreover, some Neo-Darwinists have elevated Natural Selection into a unique creative force that solves all the difficult evolutionary problems without a real empirical basis.
Her major frustration is with neuroscientists and Neo-Darwinists who teach that the mind (if there is one) is the brain and is, therefore, no more than a piece of meat that can be studied in the lab.