nematode

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roundworm

 [round´werm]
any member of the class nematoda, somewhat resembling common earthworms in appearance; many are found as parasites in humans or other animals. Those most frequently infecting humans include Ascaris lumbricoides (see ascariasis); Enterobius vermicularis (the pinworm; see enterobiasis); the hookworm (see hookworm disease); the filaria (see filariasis); and the trichina (see trichinosis).

nem·a·tode

(nem'ă-tōd),
A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

nematode

/nem·a·tode/ (nem´ah-tōd) a roundworm; any individual of the class Nematoda.

nematode

(nĕm′ə-tōd′, nē′mə-)
n.
Any of numerous worms of the phylum Nematoda, having unsegmented cylindrical bodies often narrowing at each end, and including free-living species that are abundant in soil and water, and species that are parasites of plants and animals, such as eelworms, pinworms, and hookworms. Also called roundworm.

nem′a·tode′ adj.

nematode

[nem′ətōd]
Etymology: Gk, nema + eidos, form
a multicellular, parasitic animal of the phylum Nematoda. All roundworms belong to the phylum, including Ancylostoma duodenale, Ascaris lumbricoides, Enterobius vermicularis, Necator americanus, Strongyloides stercoralis, and several other species.

nematode

Roundworm, see there.

nem·a·tode

(nem'ă-tōd)
A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

nematode

any member of the phylum Nematoda, containing roundworms such as ASCARIS.

Nematode

A type of roundworm with a long, unsegmented body, usually parasitic on animals or plants.

nem·a·tode

(nem'ă-tōd)
A common name for any roundworm of the phylum Nematoda.

nematode

a roundworm; any individual organism of the class Nematoda. Parasitism with any of the worms in this group represents a significant proportion of the diseases of animals. Includes: Ancylostoma, Ascaris, Capillaris, Dictyocaulus, Dioctophyma, Dirofilaria, Habronema, Haemonchus, Metastrongylus, Muellerius, Onchocerca, Ostertagia, Oxyuris, Parafilaria, Parascaris, Protostrongylus, Rhabditis, Skrjabinema, Spirocerca, Strongyloides, Strongylus, Syngamus, Thelazia, Trichuris, Toxocara, Trichinella, Trichostrongylus.

nematode galls
hard, fibrous excrescences produced in the seedheads of grasses by chronic inflammation created by an invasion by larvae of grass seed nematodes, e.g. Anguina spp.
grass-seed nematode
the grass seed nematode Anguina lolii infests Wimmera ryegrass and causes a fatal poisoning in animals eating the grass. Called also A. fenesta, A. agrostis. See also loliumrigidum.
References in periodicals archive ?
biologist Leonard Guarente recently showed that nematode worms with more than one copy of a gene called SIR2 live 50 percent longer than normal worms.
On the small side in the humus fauna are the bacteria, protozoa, and nematode worms.
Nematode worms are microscopic creatures that live in the soil.
Those species use the same building blocks for their DNA, proteins and fats as humans, mice and nematode worms.
A new study in nematode worms and mice also finds that a protein that transports fats around the body can hinder protective processes in cells and affect life span.
NEMATODE worms have forced a Welsh racecourse to abandon its next meeting.
7) Resveratrol has been shown to extend the life span of nematode worms by helping promote this ER stress protection response.
Glow-in-the-dark bacteria living in nematode worms flip a genetic switch to change from peaceful cohabitants into killers.
Similar results were also observed in nematode worms, allowing the scientists to conclude that their results could be applicable to a large range of living creatures.
Scientists at the Salk Institute, in California, have identified a critical gene in nematode worms that specifically links eating fewer calories to living longer.
Scientists at the University of California, working on extending our lifespan, have managed to multiply the life of nematode worms six-fold.
In the study carried out by scientists at the University of Manchester and the Buck Institute in California, nematode worms were treated with drugs to counteract natural radicals which are believed to be connected to the ageing process.