racism

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racism

A conscious or unconscious belief in the superiority of a particular race, which may lead to acts of discrimination and unequal treatment based on an individual’s skin colour or ethnic origin or identity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ra·cism

(rā'sizm)
Attitudes, practices and other factors that discriminate against people because of their race, color, or ethnicity.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The racializing gaze of negrophobia does not simply objectify him.
This updated Fanon is a fierce critic of South Africa's branch of the global post-colonial ruling classes, with the ANC exposed as post-independence nationalists colluding in the rise of "chauvinism, negrophobia, and finally racism" (Mbembe 2011); as speaking in a political discourse deaf to the "genuine issues that affect the people every day--water, electricity, education, land, housing" (Likode 2006, 187); and as profiting via "a neoliberal economic project that only 'empowers' a thin layer of African and Indian elites" (Gibson 2008, 9).
In his essay, Wegner sums up the Negrophobia of the period: "The Spanish-American War, by inciting a patriotic martial frenzy throughout the nation, had completed the South's post-Re-constructionist rapprochement with the North, at the expense of its black citizens." Wegner also discusses Charles Chesnutt's 1899 The Marrow of Tradition, which is based on the Wilmington Riots.
Fanon's unsympathetic discussion of Capecia's "Negrophobia" has drawn sharp criticism from feminist scholars that T.
By the mid 1920s, their migrations precipitated what Matthew Guterl has labeled a "southernization of northern racial discourse," in which a "southern tradition of negrophobia" supplanted Northern nativist fears of racialized new immigrant groups (12, 13).
When Nia talks about her love for "red ribbons" (56), once denied her by her mother who thought Nia "too black to wear red" (56), she exposes the painful, maternal Negrophobia inculcated by white supremacist culture.
If I summon the shape of a woman, it's because the "racism" that women suffer stems from the same causes as Negrophobia: the body, the sex.
Every white American poet should write a poem titled "Negrophobia" and every brown American poet should write a poem titled "SnowBlind: My Time Among the WASPS." If we can't wade into the subject and splash around in it, we will never find any truths but apology and blame, and there are more interesting, acute, and useful truths to find.
Nash, the racial animus that characterized antebellum Philadelphia was fueled by a "Negrophobia preached from the middle and the top." The abolitionists' influence in the city notwithstanding, no publisher in Philadelphia was willing to put his imprimatur on the controversial Uncle Tom's Cabin, and one foreign traveler observed that "Colorphobia is more rampant here than in the pro-slavery, negro-hating city of New York." (3)
argues convincingly that the segregationist scientists and their friends were white supremacists whose Negrophobia and conspiracy theories were laced with anti-Semitism.