negotiation

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negotiation

(ne-go?she-a'shun) [L. negotium, business]
A form of conflict resolution in which two or more parties discuss their differences in the hope of reaching a mutually acceptable conclusion. See: alternative dispute resolution; conflict resolution
References in periodicals archive ?
The templates of e-bargaining letters were prepared by the authors based on the more common negotiation tactics used in housing bargaining.
This kind of cost reduction is virtually impossible to obtain through merely negotiation tactics.
If negotiations are at the forefront of your work, then learning about negotiation styles and negotiation tactics are very important for you in terms of negotiating successfully.
As Ireland edges closer to exiting its EU-IMF economic adjustment programme, Junior Finance Minister Brian Hayes explains to Europolitics his country's negotiation tactics to make "the terms fit the circumstance" to address "limitations".
Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Business Professor Victoria Medvec, Ph.D., discusses effective negotiation tactics.
According to Thompson, the command has been so successful in negotiating best industry pricing that the General Services Administration (GSA) looked to them for their expertise, price points and negotiation tactics when they recently awarded the Federal Strategic Sourcing Initiative Blanket Purchase Agreements for Office Supplies, taking their accomplishments from the Navy and Marine Corps contracts all the way up to the federal level.
The survey asked hospital executives to rate health insurers on more than a dozen factors, from image and reputation, to contract negotiation tactics and claims processing issues.
getting a contract, two other negotiation tactics can help make a program manager's job easier.
Casting these conflicts as sacred initially blocks standard business-like negotiation tactics. But making strong symbolic gestures such as sincere apologies and demonstrations of respect for the other's values generates surprising flexibility, even among militants and political leaders, and may enable subsequent material negotiations, they point out.
Specifically, statements regarding a party's negotiating goals or its willingness to compromise are not seen as actionable misrepresentations of fact but ethically harmless negotiation tactics. As the commentary to the Rule provides: "Whether a particular statement should be regarded as one of fact can depend on the circumstances.