nit

(redirected from Negative income tax)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nit

 [nit]
the egg of a louse.

nit

(nit),
1. The ovum or hatched egg of a body, head, or crab louse; the egg is attached to human hair or clothing by a layer of chitin.
2. A unit of luminance; a luminous intensity of 1 candela per square meter of orthogonally projected surface.
[A.S. knitu]

nit

(nit) the egg of a louse.

nit

(nĭt)
n.
The egg of certain parasitic insects, especially a head louse.

nit′ty adj.

nit

the egg of a parasitic insect, particularly a louse. It may be found attached to human or animal hair or to clothing fiber. See also pediculosis.
enlarge picture
Microscopic view of a nit
Medical entomology An empty louse egg shell, deposited by Pediculus capitis, P corporis, Phthirus pubis—‘crabs’. See Louse
Physics nt A unit of luminance—photometric brightness equal to 1 candela/m2

nit

Medical entomology An empty louse egg shell, deposited by Pediculus capitis, P corporis, Phthirus pubis–'crabs'. See Louse.

nit

(nit)
1. The ovum of a body, head, or crab louse; it is attached to human hair or clothing by a layer of chitin.
2. A unit of luminance; a luminous intensity of 1 candela per square meter of orthogonally projected surface.
[A.S. knitu]

nit

A louse egg. Each egg is glued to the shaft of a hair very close to the skin surface. Most nits will not be removed by combing unless this fact is borne in mind. Nit-picking is not recommended.

nit

the egg of the human louse Pediculus humanus which is found attached to hair.

candela per square metre 

SI unit of luminance. Syn. nit. Symbol: cd/m2. See luminance; SI unit.

nit

louse egg.
Enlarge picture
Nit (louse egg) cemented to hair. By permission from Kummel BA, Color Atlas of Small Animal Dermatology, Mosby, 1989
References in periodicals archive ?
And the Climate Leadership Council's carbon-tax proposal was co-authored by George Shultz, who was one of the most vocal proponents of the negative income tax inside the Nixon administration.
It is possible that some workers not previously on welfare might decide to work less, given the option of an income subsidy under a negative income tax scheme.
A negative income tax for adults inevitably poses new disincentives to employment, similar to those created by the clawback * features of the NCBS.
The same could also be said, with some restrictions, for the negative income tax.
The negative income tax was "perhaps the only major policy proposal of any type [in the United States] to command the enthusiastic support of a broad spectrum of economists ranging from Milton Friedman to James Tobin".
Moreover, advocates of guaranteed income and related schemes for a negative income tax often overstate the ability to "cash out" other programs to help finance their proposed schemes.
2) After describing how his negative income tax program might work, he noted:
At the heart of Kadima's economic policy is a negative income tax, an idea that has been floated periodically in the media as a panacea for alleviating poverty.
In this collection of 18 articles contributors describe the history, debates, evidence and proposals inherent in a basic income guarantee, including such topics as the shadow of the old Poor Law, early American views on inheritance and equal shares, the guaranteed income movement of the 1960s and 1970s, negative income tax experiments, the perspective of US domestic policy, the concepts of liberal neutrality and work, exploitation, efficiency, welfare reform, back-to-work programs in France, social minima in Europe, and reports of experiences with basic income guarantees in South Africa, Brazil, Belgium.
Pat'' Brown and 17 others unanimously agreed that, as economist Milton Friedman worded it: ``We should replace the ragbag of welfare programs with a single, comprehensive program of income supplements in cash - a negative income tax.
There are many specific proposals for a Basic Income Guarantee; most of them fall into one of two broad categories: the Basic Income (BI) and the Negative Income Tax (NIT).
Without externalities, redistribution through education is an inferior approach to direct wage subsidies, although it is frequently superior to a negative income tax.