Cotard delusion

(redirected from Negation Delusion)
A rare delusional disorder linked to depression, suicidal ideation, sleep deprivation or derealisation, in which a person believes he/she is dead or dying, doesn’t exist, is putrefying, or has lost his/her blood or internal organs
Management Tricyclic antidepressants, serotoninergics

Cotard delusion

[J. Cotard, Fr. neurologist, b. 1840 d. 1889]
Delirium of negation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cotard's Syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical event, characterized by negation delusion (or nihilist), generally regarding the body (frequently the patient believes that he or she does not have one or more organs) or regarding the existence (the individual judges that himself or everybody in the world is dead or reduced to nothing, being able to judge himself a zombie), but also concerning concepts/conditions [1] (such as a CS case described in which a woman was sure about not being pregnant, despite of obvious evidences [2]).
Initially, Cotard formulated that the condition would be a new kind of depression characterized by anxious melancholy, condemnation of ideas, insensitivity to pain, negation delusion of the organs, and immortality delusion.
Thus, it is necessary that the clinicians be aware to the many possibilities of manifestation of this syndrome and, because of that, we describe in this article a CS case with negation delusions of organs and hypochondriac.