achievement motivation

(redirected from Need for Achievement)
Also found in: Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

achievement motivation

The persistent impulse to attain a high standard of performance in any activity.
References in periodicals archive ?
McClelland (1961) introduces the need for achievement concept with insightful empirical evidence on the existence of a connection between the need for achievement and business development.
* Girls have higher trend of scores on other emotion appraisal, regulation of emotion, need for achievement, self-blame, rumination, positive refocus, planning, positive reappraisal and putting into perspective than their male counterparts
We should look for and support leaders who possess an ethical element of self-restraint and a need for achievement and affiliation as well as for power.
Moreover, in using the term Janus-faced I did not wish to imply that the positive characteristics of the entrepreneur listed on the left-hand side of my Table 1 (need for achievement, energy, optimism, etc.) must lie on the same psychometrically derived Big Five dimensions as those negative ones listed on the right-hand side of the table.
Previous researchers have shown that gender, need for achievement, and the agreeableness, extraversion, and altruism of the trusted person were all associated with help-seeking behavior (Galdas, Cheater, & Marshall, 2005; Lee, 1997).
Leaders with great ambition and a superior awareness can create a state (Georgescu, 2010) and perpetuate its survival, and leaders with a need for achievement aim to satisfy their needs through competition among equals.
The literature review is also designed to provide an overview of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and McClelland's Need for Achievement theories.
He stressed the need for achievement of a global consensus on the goals and means to resolve the conflict, which would reflect the wisdom and maturity of the international community.
According to Croner, drive is made up of three components: the need for achievement, competitiveness and optimism.
Early work by McClelland in the 1960s postulated that the key to entrepreneurial behavior was the need for achievement as a source of motivation.
Central to achievement goal theory, performance-approach goals are viewed similar to mastery-approach/avoidance goals because both are based on the need for achievement but at the same time are viewed as different from mastery goals because performance- approach goals are focused on external outcomes of achievements, and are associated with fear of failure (Elliot, 1997).
Need for achievement and women's career over 14 years: Evidence for occupational structure effects.
Full browser ?