God

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God

theophobia.
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The Catholic way of interpreting this event would be to see the sun as a revelation of God -- thus, this act reveals part of the nature of God. God is constantly bestowing gifts; the sun is a primary exemplar of that, and without this generosity, life itself would cease.
We wondered if it was connected to the relational nature of God, and the inclusion into that intimate circle of love that Jesus provides for humanity.
It affects all my thoughts about the nature of God and the nature of human beings.
Current trinitarian thinking about the nature of God dwells a great deal on God's personal interrelationships, how relationship is integral to God's own being.
Hence, it sharpens what we mean by the nature of God, namely, that it is a principle of potentiality more than a principle of actuality.
Jesus didn't talk about equality or the inclusive nature of God's love, he lived it.
Along with the text of that confession (printed here side by side with those of 1925 and 1963) contributors offer commentary on such issues as the scriptures, the nature of God and man, the doctrine of salvation, baptism and the Lord's Supper, evangelism and missions, education, stewardship, the social order, cooperation, religious liberty and the family and the last things.
It is, instead, a facet of the very nature of God that becomes acute in the presence of human suffering and death.
Anselm of Canterbury, Aquinas and Hume debate the existence and nature of God, Dostoevsky and Swinburne debate evil, and Pascal clarifies reason and faith.
Finally, he attempts to show that theological debates about apostolic succession, Christology, and the Trinity portray a basic flaw shared by all parties in dialogue: a misunderstanding of the fundamental concepts of temporality, the presence of Christ, and the nature of God.
Brunner and Barth part ways on the nature of God. Ussher elegantly finds that anyone who shows the results of justification can be regarded as being justified.
A few new essays join revised articles and chapters published between 1965 and 2005 by contemporary philosophical South African theologian Brummer discuss Christian philosophy; values and facts, religion and science; language and thought; knowledge and reality; coping with evil; the nature of God; prayer, mysticism, and spirituality; Christian doctrine and the dialogue of traditions; and philosophical theology.