God

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God

theophobia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Catholic way of interpreting this event would be to see the sun as a revelation of God -- thus, this act reveals part of the nature of God.
The contrary view of Aquinas, that "exists" is implicitly the richest of all predicates, the positive core and ground of all real perfections, thus admitting of endless degrees of intensity, and that the nature of God himself is pure unlimited Subsistent Act of Existence, is said to be a meaningless set of propositions.
It affects all my thoughts about the nature of God and the nature of human beings.
We wondered if it was connected to the relational nature of God, and the inclusion into that intimate circle of love that Jesus provides for humanity.
Moreover, the Cross manifests the true nature of God as passionately affected by all the sufferings of creation.
Anselm of Canterbury, Aquinas and Hume debate the existence and nature of God, Dostoevsky and Swinburne debate evil, and Pascal clarifies reason and faith.
Current trinitarian thinking about the nature of God dwells a great deal on God's personal interrelationships, how relationship is integral to God's own being.
That is, if the nature of God is simply to be, then the personal or entitative reality of God is to be the subject of that unlimited act of being.
It is, instead, a facet of the very nature of God that becomes acute in the presence of human suffering and death.
Finally, he attempts to show that theological debates about apostolic succession, Christology, and the Trinity portray a basic flaw shared by all parties in dialogue: a misunderstanding of the fundamental concepts of temporality, the presence of Christ, and the nature of God.
In direct contrast to recent philosophical quarrels about the existence and nature of God, and human relationships with the divine, Kenny, a former Roman Catholic Priest and Master of Balliol College, Oxford, asks a few simple and startling questions: Is it possible, as humans, to prove the existence of God?
Examining in turn philosophical, historical, and non-Christian and contemporary perspectives of miracles, he explore such topics as what a miracle is, Hume, acts of God, modern science, the problem of evil, miracles after Jesus, miracles after the Reformation, the miracle of resurrection, the nature of God, non-Christian religions, and the modern world.

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