introduced species

(redirected from Naturalized species)

introduced species

one that does not naturally occur in the area and has been brought in accidentally or intentionally by man, for example, rabbits in Australia (introduced originally to the British Isles from Spain).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
They include native species, naturalized species (species introduced from elsewhere but reproducing here), common waifs (species that grow from seed blown off trucks, fallen from bird feeders, or dumped in yard waste that persist only for a few years), and major agricultural grasses (such as wheat, oats, and barley) that are repeatedly found as waifs along roads where straw was used as mulch.
Ernst Seeds currently grows about 400 native and naturalized species for seed production and limited live plant sales.
The inventories in 2009 (with additional fieldwork later) on the ten 1 [km.sup.2] quadrants registered a total of 488 indigenous species and 74 naturalized species (together with invasive species).
It is native to Europe, Africa, and parts of Asia, and it is present in other parts of the world as a naturalized species. It is an aquatic plant which grows in quiet water bodies such as ponds.
Naturalized plants are those that have spread out of cultivated areas, including gardens, into more wild areas, and invasive plants are the subset of naturalized species that cause ecological or economic harm.
Establishment of a database of naturalized species is the first step in the development of invasion biology.
Fifteen Polemonioideae species from nine genera occur in South America (discounting putatively recently naturalized species such as Collomia grandiflora; Puntieri & Brion, 2005), primarily along the west coast, which shares many climatic and ecological similarities to western North America.
The species-area relationship between both introduced and naturalized species and island area for ten Caribbean Islands was significant (p= 0.003 and 0.001, respectively) for log-transformed data.
Thus escaped crops, forages, ornamentals, and other horticultural species, account for more than 50% of naturalized species in several parts of the world (Grotkopp et al., 2010).
It was recognized as a naturalized species in the Midwest in the 1980s (Rabeler and Crowder, 1985) and in southern states more recently (Krings et al., 2005; Nesom, 2008).