natural law

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Related to Natural-law: Natural Law Party, Natural Law Theory

natural law

a doctrine that holds that there is a natural moral order or law inherent in the structure of the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is distinctive about natural-law reasoning is that it seeks to preserve the common good, whereby both the individual and the community are safeguarded.
Nevertheless, in recent decades a number of Supreme Court decisions seem to have been founded upon natural-law notions of a sort.
These two chapters form a kind of summary of the material content of Hale's natural-law theory.
The essays address evangelical reflection on the history of natural-law thinkers and their opponents but do not address evangelical political thought.
Cofounder in 1850 of the Jesuit intellectual journal Civilta Cattolica, Taparelli applied his natural-law approach in twelve years of biweekly essays to the cultural, economic, social, and political questions of the turbulent mid-nineteenthcentury world.
He is aware that since Mausbach-Ermecke, the metaphysical and epistemological tools of fundamental moral theologians have been refined to account for the exigencies of history in natural-law argumentation.
In this article, we aim to present the first ideas of social justice as they emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century from an application of Thomistic natural-law principles to social economics.
A Shared Morality: A Narrative Defense of Natural-Law Ethics
2) The natural-law character in this definition is expressed in the universal scope of this system of norms.
5) Few have therefore developed or investigated a connection between natural-law premises and economic theory.
Efforts to recast natural law as the self-given norm of autonomous human reason may seem to be helpful attempts to rehabilitate natural-law theory in our pluralist and, as Hittinger has it, postChristian milieu (cf.
Zanchi's contribution to the development of the Protestant natural-law tradition is immense, as will be seen from the sophistication with which he treats the various forms of law and the facility with which he employs the scholastic method.