natural law

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Related to Natural-law: Natural Law Party, Natural Law Theory

natural law

a doctrine that holds that there is a natural moral order or law inherent in the structure of the universe.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, it uniquely brings Reformed covenant theology into the natural-law conversation.
Interestingly, Grabill's account of Calvin's natural-law thinking points to some resources for this task, not least by stressing continuities between Calvin's rhetorical approach to theology and the discourse of late medieval accounts of the natural law.
During the 19th century, natural-law concepts were overshadowed by the powerful Utilitarian system of Jeremy Bentham; by the theories of John Austin and the Analytical Jurists; by legal positivism; and later - particularly in the United States - by legal pragmatism.
Nevertheless, some scholars still attempt to use the natural-law tradition to justify anti-gay sentiments.
By orienting themselves so much to the ancient natural-law tradition, they miss the main point of the modern natural-law tradition (which includes such venerable figures as Hugo Grotius, Samuel Pufendorf, John Locke, and even David Hume), which was to refute the ever-present skeptics by providing a firm and unchallengeable foundation and progression for the arguments for justice.
In what follows, we will first survey some of the background relevant to Hale's intellectual development as it pertains to natural-law theory.
indicates that she holds a singular notion of humanism, one which is rooted in a (revised) natural-law ethic.
Because natural-law reasoning has collapsed, is it any wonder that political dialogue has been reduced to monologue, propaganda, blame, and scapegoating?
In an era in which very long treatises are still written about very fine points in the natural-law tradition, one should not overlook this deceptively thin volume with its apparently sweeping subject matter.
Murphy works at the intersection of analytical moral and legal philosophy and contemporary natural-law theory, and his work, including the present volume, is predominately philosophical in content.
It is not an historical survey of Neo-Scholasticism, nor a systematic review of neoscholastic moral theology, nor even an evaluation of neo-scholastic natural-law theory.