natural philosophy

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natural philosophy

An obsolescent term for physics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Faraday's correspondence shows his engagement with the leading natural philosophers (mainly chemists and physicists) of the day, in England and abroad.
Chronological chapters progress from 18th-century ideas through the work of Adam Smith, Darwin and the Natural Philosophers, the Romantics, poets and conservationists, and the ideas of contemporary scientists, economists, and feminists.
On the other hand, the people who founded the country in the late 18th century considered themselves natural philosophers. These were people who studied beetles, who collected birds, who wanted to know about agricultural methods.
(5) In other terms, as the religious wars crushed the belief in the same one god, natural philosophers appealed to the supposed objective commonality of god's product, i.e.
As natural philosophers uncovered how the physical world worked, they provided essential knowledge for manipulating that world to meet practical needs.
On the other hand, the Church never offered unqualified support for all forms of inquiry and set limits beyond which natural philosophers were not allowed to go.
Aware of this instability, the seventeenth-century natural philosophers who probed nature's secrets made some effort to circumscribe the powers of nonhuman matter.
On this view, those natural philosophers who stressed God's freedom to act in the world, unbound by restrictions imposed by reason, were more likely to ground scientific knowledge in observations and experiments; whereas those who stressed God's reason were more likely to hold a rationalist conception of scientific knowledge and methods.
The history of fireworks reveals the range of relationships which existed between artisans and scientists (or natural philosophers as they were known before the 1830s).
Lewis's argument that natural philosophers aspired to develop an art of recollection, understood to be an intellectual method of abstracting knowledge from empirical data, seems to be the inspiration behind the book's title.
These figures range from images in fictional literature of talking brass heads to discussions of the homunculus by Renaissance natural philosophers and to Jewish legends of the golem.