National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

 (NIAID)
an institute of the national institutes of health; its research strives to understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic disorders affecting human beings.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.
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M2 PHARMA-September 11, 2017-Zavante Therapeutics signs clinical trial contract with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, NIH; v.2: Impact on global health.
Both the National Institute for Neurologic Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease conduct major research on MS.
"This is very important and significant work, mainly because we need [animal] studies that are proof of principle," says Marissa Miller of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease in Bethesda, Md.
The research was funded by the intramural research program at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has granted USD5.5m to Integral Molecular, a biotechnology company, to advance the development of Ebola antibodies, it was reported on Friday.
An experimental vaccine to prevent chikungunya fever, a viral disease spread by certain species of mosquitoes, is being tested in a clinical trial conducted by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) scientists at the National Institutes of Health.
Baker, a bacteriologist at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda, Md.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to develop a cell culture-based H5N1 candidate pandemic influenza vaccine.
"Many of these cell lines that we'd like to use in a cell culture-based vaccine are very hard to transfect with plasmids," says Karen Lacourciere, an influenza program officer at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Until now, it was thought to be necessary to transfect eight to twelve plasmids carrying the various viral elements into the Vero cells, and results have been less than ideal in terms of the efficiency of viral rescue--that is, the generation of sufficient numbers of viruses for vaccine use.
he has worked at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He is an associate editor of Emerging Infectious Diseases.
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