National Academies of Practice


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National Academies of Practice

 (NAP)
ten organizations, the first of which were founded in 1981, limited to 100 Distinguished Practitioners in each of the ten major health professions as recognized by the Congress of the United States: Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Optometry, Osteopathic Medicine, Pharmacy, Podiatric Medicine, Psychology, Social Work, and Veterinary Medicine. The purpose of the Academies is to advise Congress in matters of health care practice and delivery.

Patterned after the National Academy of Sciences, which advises Congress on matters of science, membership in the National Academies of Practice is contingent upon election as a Distinguished Practitioner in one of the Academies. Chosen by their peers as persons who have made a significant and enduring contribution to practice, these Distinguished Practitioners have spent an important part of their lives in the practice of their profession. By their very stature, they have transcended the turf interests of their respective professions and are prepared to address the issue of national health. The National Academies of Practice differ from the National Academy of Sciences in that their members are practitioners who have been nationally recognized primarily for their contributions to professional practice rather than achievements in science, although many are renowned scientists as well. It is the only interdisciplinary group of practitioners dedicated to addressing the problems of practice in the interests of the citizens of the United States. It is the goal and the objective of this self-supported organization to constitute itself as the nation's interdisciplinary health policy forum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The National Academies of Practice was founded in 1981 to advise governmental bodies on our health care system.
Nonetheless, a new document from the National Academies of Practice has been released that calls upon all of us to revisit our professional commitment to patient needs, and has put forth a position of ethics in the delivery of professional care services in today's managed health care environment.
Accepting that managed care was created with the intent to offer opportunity to advance quality while reducing unnecessary and wasteful expenses, the National Academies of Practice believe that it has changed the financial incentives producing a tension between economic availability and clinical care considerations bearing on patient care and patient rights.
The National Academies of Practice position is that all reasonable options, consistent with accepted clinical standards, should be presented to the patient without deterrence by insurance constraints.
The National Academies of Practice (NAP) is pleased to announce the election of Donna M.
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