NASH

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NASH

(năsh),
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

NASH

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. A fatty liver (steatosis) of any degree, with portal (and lobular) inflammation, ballooning degeneration and spotty necrosis—usually lytic in areas of fatty hepatocytes (acidophil bodies are rare). It is associated with mononuclear and polymorphonuclear infiltrate; periportal fibrosis is common, as are megamitochondria (a nonspecific indicator of mitochondrial dysfunction).

Staging
Sinusoidal fibrosis, bridging fibrosis, septum formation, evolving cirrhosis.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not the only time the play's alleged Nashe surrogate uses the words of Nashe's enemy.
Because of the complexity of the conversation between Marlowe, Nashe, and Jonson, this essay proceeds in three sections.
Critics like Gary Taylor think that Shakespeare actually wrote 1 Henry VI in collaboration with Thomas Nashe and a second author who may have been Peele, Marlowe, or Greene.
Nashe, Thomas 1964 Pierce Penniless his supplication to the devil.
He argues that the historical settings constructed in Sir Philip Sidney's The Countess of Pembrokes Arcadia (1593),Thomas Deloney's Jack of Newbury (1619), Thomas of Reading (1612), and The Gentle Craft (1637), and Thomas Nashe's The Unfortunate Traveller (1594) are integral to a complex understanding of these works.
THOUGH McLuhan's dissertation was originally titled The Place of Thomas Nashe in the Learning of His Time, the actual content of the study is far more wide-ranging than a study of Nashe.
Katherine Parr, John Leland, Luke Shepherd, Robert Crowley and Nicholas Udall, William, Baldwin, Thomas Wilson, John Proctor, Hall's Chronicle, George Cavendish, translations of Virgil's Aeneid, the importance of travel to Italy, Foxe's Acts and Monuments, Tudor Pastorals, Sir Philip Sidney, Marlowe, Nashe and George Pettie and this is only a sampling.
Vincent Millay, Frost, Nashe, Wordsworth, Shelley and Browning, only to name a few.
In this study, Ellinghausen examines the careers of the non-aristocratic authors, Isabella Whitney, Thomas Nashe, Ben Jonson, John Taylor, and George Wither.
The Renaissance author whom Rhodes finds closest to this version of Shakespeare is neither Marlowe, nor Jonson, but the exuberant Thomas Nashe (in whose work he has a longstanding scholarly interest).
In the writings of Thomas Nashe, for instance, the frustrations of the unemployed university graduate are channelled into an authorial identity predicated on resentment.