vitamin K

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vi·ta·min K

generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork, liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils, essential for the formation of normal amounts of prothrombin.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

vitamin K

n.
A fat-soluble vitamin, occurring in leafy green vegetables, tomatoes, and egg yolks, that promotes blood clotting and prevents hemorrhaging. It exists in several related forms, such as K1 and K2.

vitamin K1

n.
A yellow viscous oil, C31H46O2, found in leafy green vegetables or made synthetically, used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called phylloquinone.

vitamin K2

n.
A crystalline compound, C41H56O2, isolated from putrefied fish meal or from various intestinal bacteria, used to stop hemorrhaging and in veterinary medicine as an antidote to certain poisons. Also called menaquinone.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

vitamin K

A general term for the structurally similar fat-soluble vitamins (K1, K2, K3) required for the hepatic synthesis of prothrombin; coagulant factors VII, IX and X; and 2-methyl-1,4 naphthoquinone and its derivatives, which have antihaemorrhagic activity.

Dietary sources
Cheese, green tea, leafy greens, liver, oats, egg yolks.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

vi·ta·min K

(vī'tă-min)
Generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils, essential for the formation of normal amounts of prothrombin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

vitamin K

or

phylloquinone

a fat-soluble molecule found in spinach, cabbage, kale and pig's liver. The vitamin is essential in the synthesis of prothrombin used in BLOOD CLOTTING. A deficiency causes an increase in clotting time.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

vi·ta·min K

(vī'tă-min)
Generic descriptor for compounds with the biologic activity of phylloquinone; fat-soluble, thermostable compounds found in alfalfa, pork, liver, fish meal, and vegetable oils.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of the toxicologic effect of naphthoquinone compounds, it was reported that ShD did not induce any hematologic toxicity in animal models, which indicates that ShD may be safe for use in vivo (31), whereas another report demonstrated toxicity in mice by intraperitoneal administration at a dose of 20 mg/kg for S, 41.0/22.75 mg/kg for AS, and 48 mg/kg for 3,3-[beta], [beta]-DMAS.
The proposed synthetic work was carried out leading to 28 naphthoquinones of four different scaffolds that were assayed for in vitro antiplasmodial activity against chloroquineresistant P.
Plumbagin (2-methoxy-5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a natural naphthoquinone possessing various pharmacological activities such as antimalarial (16), antimicrobial (17), anticancer (18), cardiotonic (19) and antifertility action (20).
These results are consistent with our previously published work showing that naphthoquinones and benzoquinones are capable of selectively modifying RyR1 channels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (Feng et al.
Effects of plant-derived naphthoquinones on the growth of Pleurotus sajor-caju and degradation of the compounds by fungal cultures.
The secretions of the two sironids consist of complex arrays of ketones and naphthoquinones.
Isolation, characterization, and biological activity of naphthoquinones from Calceolaria andina L.