nanoid

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nanoid

 [nan´oid]
dwarfish.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nanoid

adjective
(1) Dwarf-like. 
(2) Dwarfish.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Designing the first nanobot and controlling nanorobotic swarms will be a huge computational task, itself requiring the use of available AI.
have been engaged in in situ SEM material test since 1966; they developed a nanorobotic indentation system to realize in situ indentation test.
Medical Nanorobotics. International Journal of Surgery Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 243-246, 2005.
While much of the research on self-replication and nanorobotics is still in its infancy and primarily in national level laboratories, the next topic, information technology, is not.
Washington, Mar 16 (ANI): Drug delivery that precisely targets cancerous cells without exposing the healthy surrounding tissue to the medication's toxic effects may soon be a reality, thanks a new research by Professor Sylvain Martel, Director of the Nanorobotics Laboratory at Polytechnique Montreal.
As stated in the preface, contributions (from an impressively international roster of authors) are written in a "tutorial style, which means that state-of-the-art scientific content is enriched with fundamental equations and illustrations...." Arrangement is in sections on nano-bio interfacing, nanotoxicology, clinical significance of nanosystems, medical imaging, drug delivery, response to nanomaterials, cancer therapy, quantum engines and nanomotors, and nanorobotics (e.g.
Nanorobotics is an emerging research field and can be generally divided into two areas: nanometer-scale manipulation of nanometer-sized objects and construction of nanometer-scale robots.
"The strain-gated logic devices are designed to interface with the ambient environment, which is associated with low-frequency mechanical actions, and the aim and targeting applications are different from those of conventional silicon devices which aim at speed." Envisaged applications include nanorobotics, transducers, micromachines, human-computer interfacing, and microfluidics (where tiny channels carry various liquids, usually to be mixed for reaction tightly controlled ways).
"But to take that locomotion and put it to productive use for fabrication of nanoscale components, that's still a futuristic goal" Yet engineers should continue to experiment with these nanomachines to pave the way for novel discoveries in nanorobotics, Pierce says.
Andrew Hessel showcases his vision for open-source drug manufacturing and noted nanoscientist Robert Freitas details the medical future of nanorobotics. Then two teachers--Janna Anderson and Mark Bauerlein--present two distinct visions for education in the twenty-first century.
Current status of nanomedicine and medical nanorobotics. J Comput Theor Nanosci 2005; 2 : 1-25.