nanoid

(redirected from Nanorobotics)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nanoid

 [nan´oid]
dwarfish.

nanoid

/nan·oid/ (nan´oid) dwarfish.

nanoid

adjective
(1) Dwarf-like. 
(2) Dwarfish.

nanoid

dwarfish.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Designing the first nanobot and controlling nanorobotic swarms will be a huge computational task, itself requiring the use of available AI.
This nanorobotic system could substitute the human vascular system.
Weir, Sierra, and Jones, "Review of Research in the Field of Nanorobotics," 8.
Sylvain Martel and his colleagues at the NanoRobotics Laboratory of Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal in Canada are using magnetic fields as well to guide medical robots but are enlisting the help of magnetic-resonance imaging machines to propel small beads through the bloodstream.
Medical nanorobotics holds the greatest promise for curing disease and extending health span.
The premier issue focuses on issues of human enhancement, including sports and enhancement research, social perspectives and genetic enhancement, virtue ethics and prenatal genetic enhancement, enhancement and its relation to eugenics, genetic enhancement and procreative autonomy, societal considerations of life span extension, medical nanorobotics, and related aging intervention research.
Nanorobotics may be applied in the future for early detection as well as treatment of cancer.
In the next 25 years, we will learn how to augment our 100 trillion very slow interneuronal connections with high-speed virtual connections via nanorobotics.
This is the challenge that Sylvain Martel, scientific director of the new Nanorobotics Laboratory at the Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, has chosen to tackle.
It identifies wind and wave power, health and biotechnology and hi-tech industries such nanorobotics as areas for growth.
Updates to the nine-book set include: the addition of plant life to the volume on animal life for full biological coverage; changes in DNA sequencing technology and revolutionary molecular dating of the history of evolution; emerging public health crises such as mad cow disease and anthrax; a new theory about how oceans affect climate; the discovery of new superheavy elements; and leaps in computer technology ranging from digital cameras to nanorobotics.