Naegleria fowleri infection

Naegleria fowleri infection

A rare but severe protozoal infection causing destructive changes in the brain and meninges (necrotizing amoebic meningoencephalitis). Most infected people have a history of swimming in warm fresh water, or at a spa 2 to14 days before the onset. The organism gains access to the brain by way of the cribriform plate at the upper part of the nose. The infection mimics bacterial meningitis and the true diagnosis is usually missed. There is high fever, neck stiffness, coma, convulsions and death within a few days of onset. Autopsy shows brain softening. The only effective drug is Amphotericin B given intravenously and into the cerebrospinal fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fatal Naegleria fowleri infection acquired in Minnesota: possible expanded range of a deadly thermophilic organism.
Data suggest that innate immunity may play a greater role than acquired immunity in resistance to the Naegleria fowleri infection (Marciano-Cabral & Cabral, 2007).
Few cases of patients who have survived a Naegleria fowleri infection are identified very early, and survivors have some form of residual physical and cognitive impairment (Parija et al.
Other pathogens covered by nonmandatory surveillance activities in at least one country included Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, dengue fever, echinococcosis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, Mediterranean spotted fever, Naegleria fowleri infections, norovirus infections, Rife Valley fever, Q fever, rotavirus infections, and vellow fever.
Severe Brain Infections and the Environment: The Changing Epidemiology of Naegleria fowleri Infections