Naegleria fowleri infection

Naegleria fowleri infection

A rare but severe protozoal infection causing destructive changes in the brain and meninges (necrotizing amoebic meningoencephalitis). Most infected people have a history of swimming in warm fresh water, or at a spa 2 to14 days before the onset. The organism gains access to the brain by way of the cribriform plate at the upper part of the nose. The infection mimics bacterial meningitis and the true diagnosis is usually missed. There is high fever, neck stiffness, coma, convulsions and death within a few days of onset. Autopsy shows brain softening. The only effective drug is Amphotericin B given intravenously and into the cerebrospinal fluid.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Answering another question, Dr Pechuho said that seven people died of Naegleria fowleri infection (NFI) across the province.
"There have been no reports of other illnesses, and Naegleria fowleri infection does not spread from person to person," Brittany Behm, spokeswoman at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, wrote in an email.
Naegleria fowleri The only certain way to prevent a Naegleria fowleri infection caused by swimming is to refrain from water-related activities in warm freshwater.
Senior Director Dr Birbal Genani said that the major source of Naegleria Fowleri commonly known as the brain-eating amoeba is warm and fresh water, unchlorinated water supply, which enters through nose and causes brain cell damage leading to Naegleria Fowleri infection while swimming bathing and during ablution.
Senior Director Medical and Health Services, KMC, Dr Birbal Genani, said major source of Naegleria Fowleri commonly known as the brain-eating amoeba is warm and fresh water, unchlorinated water supply, which enters through nose and causes brain cell damage leading to Naegleria Fowleri infection while swimming bathing and during ablution.
Fatal Naegleria fowleri infection acquired in Minnesota: possible expanded range of a deadly thermophilic organism.
DeVries et al., "Fatal Naegleria fowleri infection acquired in minnesota: possible expanded range of a deadly thermophilic organism," Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol.
Data suggest that innate immunity may play a greater role than acquired immunity in resistance to the Naegleria fowleri infection (Marciano-Cabral & Cabral, 2007).
Immunization of mice against Naegleria fowleri infection. Infect Immun, 1977; 16: 817-820.
* Severe Brain Infections and the Environment: The Changing Epidemiology of Naegleria fowleri Infections