defect

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defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·fect

(dē'fekt), Negative or pejorative connotations of this word may render it offensive in some contexts.
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

defect

Medtalk A malformation or abnormality. See Acquired platelet function defect, Atrial septal defect, Atrioventricular conduction defect, Birth defect, Developmental field defect, Enzyme defect, Epigenetic defect, Fibrous cortical defect, Filling defect, Homonymous field defect, Mass defect, Neural tube defect, Slot defect, Ventricular septal defect.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, anomaly, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; a qualitative departure from what is expected. usage note Often confused with deficiency, which is a quantitative shortcoming.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

de·fect

(dē'fekt)
An imperfection, malformation, dysfunction, or absence; an attribute of quality, in contrast with deficiency, which is an attribute of quantity.
[L. deficio, pp. -fectus, to fail, to lack]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about defect

Q. Is it a birth defect in children? I know about the causes of autism. Is it a birth defect in children?

A. it's not an easy answer i'm afraid...there are congenital differences, but no "birth defect" that we can detect. there's a good pdf file that gives a full explanation about it...i think you'll find it useful:
http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:U7PHTfTAZhYJ:www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf+http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/upload/autism_overview_2005.pdf&hl=iw&ct=clnk&cd=1&gl=il

Q. why does ADHD make kind of an hype to children? is it a nerve defect?

A. it's a complex interaction among genetic and environmental factors causing a disorder in the central nervous system. a study showed a delay in development of certain brain structures n the frontal cortex and temporal lobe, which are believed to be responsible for the ability to control and focus thinking.

More discussions about defect
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References in periodicals archive ?
Maternal parity and the birth order of affected children were obtained from the files of 555 families with a member with an NTD. Comparison of these findings to parity of mothers (n=2 249) sampled randomly from the general population [26] showed that significantly more NTDs occurred in the first pregnancy than in subsequent pregnancies (43% v.
An RR of 2.28% (1/44) was calculated for the subsequent children of a couple who had one child with an NTD. As expected from the incidence of NTDs in the Gauteng population, which is at the lower end of occurrences of NTDs worldwide, [1] the RR also falls at the lower end of the range of risks reported in the literature.
Administration of folic acid decreases the risk of NTD. Therefore, to find out whether genes in connection with folic acid showed differential expression in NTD fetuses, specific genes were investigated and compared with control samples.
Genes of dihydrofolate reductase (1st enzyme of folate metabolism), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (enzyme playing a role in the methylation cycle), and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (important enzyme in purine nucleotide biosynthesis) enzymes showed an increased expression in NTD cases compared with controls, a finding that suggests a compensating effect for the developed NTD. Although identification of the relationship between folic acid and NTD is valuable, the discovery of other risk factors is essential.
During early pregnancy these factors increase the risk of developing an NTD. Thus, during early pregnancy, individuals with this polymorphism may require more folate in their diet.
Spina bifida and anencephaly (failure of anterior tube closure) are the most common forms of NTD. Investigation of the cluster revealed a high prevalence of NTDs in this region (27 per 10,000 live births) (Texas Department of Health, unpublished report) that proved endemic to the entire Texas-Mexico border region.
I tend to NTD-affected pregnancies almost on a daily basis and have yet to encounter a patient who used folic acid, which may have prevented the NTD. This is a tragedy and should rally all of us to recommit ourselves to educating women to take folic acid as recommended by the CDC.
According to Bone, GORDIAN has transferred ownership of its jukebox technology to NTD. In exchange for GORDIAN's investment risk in the initial development of the jukebox, and the transfer of the technology to NTD, GORDIAN will receive royalty revenues from jukebox sales commensurate with these risks and investments.
A pregnancy outcome was documented for 148 pregnancies; 117(79%) of the pregnancies resulted in non-NTD-affected live births, 24(16%) in miscarriages or incomplete spontaneous abortions, six (4%) in elective abortions, and one (1%) in a confirmed recurrent NTD. Five women known to be pregnant were lost to follow-up.