NSAID


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NSAID

(ĕn′sĕd′)
n.
A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen.

NSAID

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, see there.

NSAID

(en'sād)

NSAID

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are medications such as aspirin and ibuprofen that decrease pain and inflammation. Many can now be obtained without a doctor's prescription.

Patient discussion about NSAID

Q. Is there any good source for heel pain relief, besides NSAIDs? My heel pain is most severe at night when I sleep. It's as if the way I position my feet worsen the condition, but I'm at a loss to know how to position my feet. During the day my heels feel so but don't typically bother me.

A. I have found that keeping my feet flexed (the position they are in when standing) helps ease the pain of plantar facitis. I also don't let my feet get cold(wear socks)and keep heavy blankets and quilts off the feet. Placing a box under the covers at the foot of the bed will help keep the blankets up. Do try the exercises recommended on the above web sites. It usually resolves in about 6 months. Best wishes!

More discussions about NSAID
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might be associated with several GI problems, including particularly dyspeptic symptoms, peptic ulcer, and GI bleeding.
"We think this is the end of the road for the use of NSAIDs for treatment or prevention of Alzheimer's disease, and it suggests a need for caution about using other anti-inflammatory drugs for this purpose," added Dr Breitner.
NSAIDs appeared safe in high-risk patients with musculoskeletal disease and chronic kidney disease, hypertension, or heart failure, in a retrospective, observational study.
The current study is limited by the small sample of eyes included and the fact that we did not include more groups to assess other NSAID agents.
pylori infection, we did not check it in the present study, because we have focused our attention on the effects of NSAID and/or LDA use on gastrointestinal symptoms when ulcers developed at our clinic or in a related facility.
Patients' perceptions of NSAID plasters' analgesic effects differed by the affected site.
One of the obstacles in the NSAID challenge test is desensitization, which might influence the OPT in such a way that the outcome can be a false negative (19, 20).
Our study demonstrated that 15% of these patients received one type of NSAID during the study period.
* The risk of heart attack or stroke can occur as early as the first weeks of using an NSAID.
In a July 9 drug safety communication, the agency did not provide the exact language that will be used on NSAID labels, but said that they "will be revised to reflect" information describing that: