ketamine hydrochloride

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ketamine hydrochloride

[kē′təmēn]
a nonbarbiturate general anesthetic induction agent administered parenterally to achieve dissociative anesthesia. Ketamine hydrochloride does not cause muscle relaxation. It is a potent somatic analgesic and is particularly useful for brief, minor surgical procedures. Hallucinations, confusion, and disorientation may occur on emergence from anesthesia. See also dissociative anesthesia.
A surgical anaesthetic withdrawn from the market due to disorientation and violent behaviour that occurred when patients regained consciousness; on the club scene, ketamine is in liquid form or a white powder snorted or smoked with marijuana or tobacco products
Pharmacologic effects Dissociative anaesthesia, CNS stimulant, hallucinations, visual distortion, a loss of senses, sense of time, and identity for 30 minutes to 2 hours, delirium, amnesia, impaired motor function, hypertension, depression, recurrent flashbacks, potentially fatal respiratory problems

ketamine hydrochloride

N -methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist used to reduce intraoperative pain; contraindicated in hypertensive patients

ketamine hydrochloride

a nonbarbiturate anesthetic related to phencyclidine (PCP), which is administered intravenously or intramuscularly to produce dissociative anesthesia. It has serious limitations in usefulness in animals. It is used routinely in cats and nonhuman primates, in combination with other agents and for short-term procedures.