acute hospital trust

(redirected from NHS acute hospital trust)

acute hospital trust

The organisational and managerial infrastructure of hospitals in the UK. Acute trusts ensure that hospitals provide high-quality healthcare, spend their money efficiently, and decide how a hospital will develop so that services improve. Acute trusts employ most of the NHS workforce, including health professionals (e.g., doctors, nurses, pharmacists, midwives and health visitors), allied health workers (e.g., physiotherapists, radiographers, podiatrists, speech and language therapists, counsellors, occupational therapists, psychologists and healthcare scientists), and non-medical support staff (e.g., receptionists, porters, cleaners, IT specialists, managers, engineers, caterers and domestic and security staff).

Some acute trusts are regional or national centres for more specialised care. Others are attached to universities and help to train health professionals. Acute trusts may also provide services in the community—e.g., through health centres, clinics or in people's homes. Some acute trusts are regional centres for more specialised health services (e.g., cancer, severe burns, or spinal injuries). Others include teaching hospitals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Services will be provided by the Sure Start team, Darlington Primary Care Trust, Darlington NHS Acute Hospital Trust, and Darlington Council.
Services are being provided by the SureStart team, Darlington Primary Care Trust, Darlington NHS Acute Hospital Trust and Darlington Council.
Services will be provided by the SureStart team, Darlington Primary Care Trust, Darlington NHS Acute Hospital Trust and Darlington Council.
137 NHS acute hospital trusts (non-specialist) in England have received detailed plans that show how and where they can improve patient care and become more efficient.
The survey of NHS acute hospital trusts was conducted by Five News correspondent Catherine Jacob, who also interviewed the Climbies.