Strategic Health Authority

(redirected from NHS Strategic Health Authority)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

Strategic Health Authority

Any of the 10 regional bodies which manage the local NHS on behalf of central UK government and the Secretary of State, acting as the local headquarters for the NHS and providing the bridge between the Department of Health and local health-service organisations, including the local NHS Trusts and primary care trusts (PCTs). SHAs are responsible for strategic planning and performance management of health services in their area. Their remit is to ensure that the health of the locals is maintained and improved, and that they have faster access to modern, high-quality and cost-effective health services when they need them, making sure national target areas are met and services expanded as needed.

 Organisational structure
A board of executive and non-executive directors runs each SHA. The non-executive directors are Government appointees; the executive directors are appointed by the chairperson (a non-executive member) of the SHA. SHAs are monitored by the Department of Health’s Directorates of Health & Social Care.

SHA Timeline
When the NHS was created in the late 1940s, England was divided into Regional Hospital Boards. These were replaced by Regional Health Authorities (RHAs), which were operational from 1974 to 1996, after which they were reorganised into approximately 100 NHS Health Authorities. In 2002, these were consolidated into 28 SHAs, which were reduced in 2006 to 10.

STA responsibilities
• Develop plans for improving health services in their local area;
• Ensure that local health services are of a high quality and are performing well;
• Increase capacity of local health services so they can provide more services; and
• Integrate national priorities (e.g., programmes for improving cancer services) into local health service plans.
References in periodicals archive ?
But I have read the Scrutiny Report and have read the Cabinet are going to ask the NHS Strategic Health Authority to investigate (the shortage of GP services in Ashbrow ward).
Regional businesses supporting WaterAid include New Century Enterprises, Billingham, Rocket Science/Click Squared, Middlesbrough, Seymour (Civil Engineering) Limited, Hartlepool, JN Bentley Limited and Lumsden & Carroll Construction, Durham, Fastflow Pipeline Services Ltd, Washington, Gowland & Dawson and Leighton Group, Sunderland, UTS Engineering Ltd, Jarrow, Byzak Ltd and United Carlton Office Systems Ltd, Gateshead, NCJ Media, NHS Strategic Health Authority, Blumilk, Black & Veatch, and MWH, Newcastle upon Tyne, Labtec (Services) Ltd, Blyth.
South East Coast NHS Strategic Health Authority were ruled to be 72.
The conference was attended by a wide range of regional organisations and businesses including the Learning and Skills Council, the NHS Strategic Health Authority, and disability and voluntary organisations.