NHS Quality Improvement Scotland

NHS Quality Improvement Scotland

A body constituted by article 3 of the NHS Quality Improvement Scotland Order 2002 (S.S.I. 2002/534), which led initiatives to improve the quality of care and treatment by NHS Scotland. As a special health board, NHS QIS covered all of Scotland rather than a particular geographical area. It was dissolved in 2011.
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Leslie Marr, of NHS Quality Improvement Scotland, said: "This is the first time we have had statistics for postcode areas.
The NHS Quality Improvement Scotland study found 15 of the 648 youngsters were primary pupils.
They failed to implement recommendations by watchdogs NHS Quality Improvement Scotland three years ago that all pregnant women should get a second scan to detect foetal abnormalities.
NHS Quality Improvement Scotland and NHS Education for Scotland, Scotland.
The NHS Quality Improvement Scotland today approved TVT as an effective treatment for many women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a common but debilitating condition.
The recommendation came in a report on transfusions compiled by NHS Quality Improvement Scotland.
The report, from NHS Quality Improvement Scotland, also highlighted key strengths such as helping women with complications conceive, strong screening and diagnosis.
In particular, he wants Chisholm to be able to send in hit squads to hospitals that fail to meet cleanliness standards policed by the new watchdog NHS Quality Improvement Scotland.
The guidelines were set out by NHS Quality Improvement Scotland after their probe into how children's medical records were found at the disused Strathmartine Hospital in Dundee.
The findings from NHS Quality Improvement Scotland are in a followup to a 2003 report which identified take-up rates as a "challenge".
NHS Quality Improvement Scotland have produced the guidelines which set out the best ways to diagnose and treat meningitis.
New figures published today by NHS Quality Improvement Scotland show that between 2000 and 2005 the number of children 16 and under prosecuted nationwide rose from 18 to 54 - a 200 per cent rise.